Diabetes Nation: U.S. Cases Soar With 100% Increase In Some States

(Willie Lunchmeat/Flickr)

(Willie Lunchmeat/Flickr)

These eye-popping numbers should make every U.S. citizen rush outside immediately for a brisk walk and eat a leafy green salad for dinner (hold the blue cheese dressing).

The CDC reports that diabetes cases are increasing at a staggering clip throughout the U.S., with an increase of 100 percent or more in some states between 1995 and 2010.

From the CDC news release:

The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes increased in all U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico between 1995 and 2010, according to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). During that time, the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes increased by 50 percent or more in 42 states, and by 100 percent or more in 18 states. [My bold.]

The report, appearing in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, finds that states with the largest increases are Oklahoma (226 percent), Kentucky (158 percent), Georgia (145 percent), Alabama (140 percent), and Washington (135 percent).

“Regionally, we saw the largest increase in diagnosed diabetes prevalence in the South, followed by the West, Midwest, and Northeast,” said Linda Geiss, a statistician with CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation and lead author of the report. “These data also reinforce findings from previous studies, which indicate that the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes is highest in the southern and Appalachian states.”

The study, which uses data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System – an annual telephone survey of health behaviors and conditions of US adults aged 18 and older – found that the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in 2010 was 10 percent or more in six states and Puerto Rico.

“In 1995 only three states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico had a diagnosed diabetes prevalence of 6 percent or more. By 2010, all 50 states had a prevalence of more than 6 percent,” said Ann Albright, Ph.D., R.D., director of CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation. “These rates will continue to increase until effective interventions and policies are implemented to prevent both diabetes and obesity.”

Type 2 diabetes, which may be prevented through lifestyle changes, accounts for 90 percent to 95 percent of all diabetes cases in the United States. CDC and its partners are working on a variety of initiatives to prevent type 2 diabetes and to reduce complications in those already diagnosed.

CDC leads the National Diabetes Prevention Program, a public-private partnership that brings evidence-based programs for preventing type 2 diabetes to communities. The program is helping to establish a network of lifestyle-change classes for overweight or obese people at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. As well, the National Diabetes Education Program – a partnership of CDC and NIH – provides resources to improve the treatment and outcomes of people with diabetes, promote early diagnosis, and prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes.

Also today, CDC introduced a new online tool, Diabetes Interactive Atlases, which provides data for diagnosed diabetes, obesity and leisure-time physical inactivity at the national, state and county levels. The new tool also includes interactive motion charts showing trends in the growth of diabetes and obesity throughout the United States and within states.

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Iowa Bob

    Enough already. Stop illustrating diabetes articles with pictures of fat people. Often diabetes and its treatment makes you gain weight. Much diabetes is caused by genes. Part of the reason we have so many diabetics is that treatment and diagnosis has improved. If you want to do a service-take a look at why treatment costs so much. Test strips are $1 each and insulin is 25% more expensive in the US than in Canada (made in Germany). It doesn’t help anyone to blame the victim. We are a lot better at making money from disease than we are at preventing it.

  • Evan Pankey

    This is an epidemic of unnecessary suffering.
    The symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes is largely amenable/reversible with low carbohydrate high fat dietary intervention. This intervention is safe and effective.
    Don’t take my word for it.
    see:

    The
    Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making
    the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and
    Enjoyable by Stephen D. Phinney and Jeff S. Volek (May 19, 2011)

    • paula jones

      I agree and thanks Evan for the reference.