adolescent health

RECENT POSTS

What Teens Say Teens Should Know About Sexually Transmitted Diseases

(Planned Parenthood)

(Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts)

By Joey Boots-Ebenfield
Guest contributor

I’ve gotten used to hearing myths and misinformation when I talk about sex with fellow teens.

And I talk about sex often in my role as an 17-year-old peer educator with the Planned Parenthood Get Real Teen Council (GRTC) — a year-long high school sexual health program for 10th-12th graders who are trained to facilitate sex education workshops and serve as resources for peers, families and communities.

If teens are uncomfortable talking about topics related to sex and sexuality, or don’t have a trusted source of information about their health, it’s easy for all kinds of misinformation to spread. And of course, there’s the Internet, where bad information is often rampant, so it’s not always a reliable place to find accurate health information.

The subject of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is no exception. I’ve heard some pretty interesting misconceptions about what STDs are and what it’s like to get tested. One myth is that STDs have obvious symptoms, like localized pain or some other physical sign.

In fact, this is quite the opposite! STDs often show NO symptoms. This myth is especially dangerous because it means that someone can have an STD and not even know it. As a result, many STDs go untreated, which can cause cause some pretty nasty complications. Continue reading

Coerced Sex Common For Teen Boys And Young Men, Study Finds

A few nights ago, unable to wind down, I was searching for something to watch and stumbled across the film “Adore.” It’s about a pair of lifelong friends (grown women) who end up having affairs with each other’s young, hunky, 19- or 20-year-old sons. My first reaction was the same as one Netflix commenter:

“…if this had been two pals and each other’s teen daughter; well, you get the point. The movie would not have been made, or if so, it would have had an entirely different hue-to say the least. DOUBLE STANDARDS.”

Or, as A.O Scott wrote in his New York Times review:

“It is worth noting that the same movie about a couple of dads sleeping with each other’s 20-year-old daughters would need, at a minimum, to confront the ickiness of the situation. Really, such a movie would be unlikely to make it into theaters, in spite of the commonness of real-life relationships between older men and younger women.”

(Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancoft in "The Graduate"; Movie-Fan/flickr)

(Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancoft in “The Graduate”; Movie-Fan/flickr)

The film isn’t about sexually coercion; but it is about boundary breaking, and I thought of it again reading this new study on the pervasive, but largely unexamined problem of sexual coercion among boys and young men.

The study, published in the journal Psychology of Men and Masculinity, found that coerced sex is fairly common for teenage boys and college-age men and can lead to psychological distress and risky behavior, such as sexual risk-taking and alcohol use.

From the American Psychological Association news release:

A total of 43 percent of high school boys and young college men reported they had an unwanted sexual experience and of those, 95 percent said a female acquaintance was the aggressor…

“Sexual victimization continues to be a pervasive problem in the United States, but the victimization of men is rarely explored,” said lead author Bryana H. French, PhD, of the University of Missouri. “Our findings can help lead to better prevention by identifying the various types of coercion that men face and by acknowledging women as perpetrators against men.” Continue reading

Third Teen Suicide In Newton: What Can You Say?

Newton South (Wikimedia Commons)

Newton South (Wikimedia Commons)

Tonight at the Newton South High School auditorium, school officials and mental health experts will try to offer some guidance on how to talk to children about suicide and how best to support kids and families reeling from the news of a third teen suicide in this community since the start of the school year.

Tonight’s gathering comes after reports that 17-year-old Roee Grutman, a popular Newton South junior, committed suicide earlier this month. (According to the state Executive Office of Public Safety & Security, Grutman’s death was a result of “asphyxia by hanging.”)

Grutman’s death follows two other suicides: Katherine Stack, a Newton South sophomore, took her own life in October, shortly after Karen Douglass, a Newton North senior, also committed suicide.

At a memorial service for Grutman last night, hundreds of classmates and family members gathered to remember the “bright, articulate, compassionate” young man, The Boston Globe reports:

“One after another, the speakers at Monday’s service told of a young man who lit up a room when he walked in, and despite his schedule busy with honors classes and sports, always had time for a friend.”

According to parents in the Newton South community, many children are still in shock (as are their parents and teachers) and struggling to comprehend the string of suicides in general, and in particular, the death of a boy who appeared to be so well-adjusted, socially connected and stable.

“I think the kids are beside themselves,” said Elizabeth Knoll, whose 17-year-old daughter, Anya Graubard, is also a Newton South junior and was friends with Roee. “My daughter was gray and pale and tightlipped for the last two days.” (Knoll says Anya gave her permission to be named here.)

Knoll said in Newton — where many kids have been classmates since the age of 4 — Grutman’s out-of-the-blue suicide is particularly excruciating. “No one among his family or friends…could see anything like this coming,” Knoll said. “It’s impossible to make any sense of it.” Continue reading

Pet Study: Cute, Furry And (Possibly) A Catalyst For Better Adolescent Behavior

Pets, if you haven’t already noticed, are no longer simply pets. They are political (ban the puppy mills!); they are personal therapists; they are leading blog protagonists (see: My House Rabbit) and for some, they are prized surrogate children.

Now, it turns out, pets may have yet another dimension: they might contribute to more positive adolescent behavior (and you thought that was impossible). Indeed, a new study led by Tufts researchers finds that young adults caring for animals may develop deeper social connections and other positive traits such as empathy.

Here’s more from the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts news release:

girlanddogs

Young adults who care for an animal may have stronger social relationships and connection to their communities, according to a paper published online in Applied Developmental Science.

While there is mounting evidence of the effects of animals on children in therapeutic settings, not much is known about if and how everyday interactions with animals can impact positive youth development more broadly.

“Our findings suggest that it may not be whether an animal is present in an individual’s life that is most significant but rather the quality of that relationship,” said the paper’s author, Megan Mueller, Ph.D., a developmental psychologist and research assistant professor at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. “The young adults in the study who had strong attachment to pets reported feeling more connected to their communities and relationships.”

Mueller surveyed more than 500 participants, aged 18-26 and predominately female, about their attitudes and interaction with animals. Those responses were indexed against responses the same participants had given on a range of questions that measure positive youth development characteristics such as competence, caring, confidence, connection, and character, as well as feelings of depression, as part of a national longitudinal study, the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development, which was led by Tufts Professor of Child Development Richard Lerner, Ph.D., and funded by the National 4-H Council.

Young adults who cared for animals reported engaging in more “contribution” activities, such as providing service to their community, helping friends or family and demonstrating leadership, than those who did not. The more actively they participated in the pet’s care, the higher the contribution scores. The study also found that high levels of attachment to an animal in late adolescence and young adulthood were positively associated with feeling connected with other people, having empathy and feeling confident. Continue reading

Young Girls Afraid To Gain Weight And Get Fat, Study Finds

mikebaird/flickr

mikebaird/flickr

A smart, health-conscious mom I know just drew the line: she’s going to stop reading “Grain Brain” — the compelling, controversial, potentially crazy-making new book that details the evils of carbs in general and grains in particular. She, and so many others, initially loved the book, which argues that carbs, even the whole grain variety, can “destroy” your brain and “cause demential, ADHA, anxiety” and more.

The problem, says this mom (beyond the what-can-I-possibly-pack-the-kids-for-lunch-with-no-grains dilemma), is that all the chatter about “bad foods” around her daughters might possibly increase their chances of developing an eating disorder.

This rang true to me as I came across this recent U.K. study on eating disorders in early adolescence.

Researchers from University College London Institute of Child Health and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine found that “six in 10 13-year-old girls, compared to four in 10 boys the same age, are afraid of gaining weight or getting fat.” And it got worse when the young teenage girls got a bit older, notes the report, published online in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

The bottom line results, according to the study of more than 7,000 13-year-olds: “Extreme levels of fear of weight gain, avoidance of fattening foods, and distress about weight and shape were common among girls.”

Here’s more from the study, according to the news release:

•One in three girls (34%) and one in five boys (21%) were upset or distressed about weight and shape

•One in two girls (53%) and four in 10 boys (41%) avoided fatty foods

•A quarter of girls (26%) and one in seven boys (14.5%) had restricted their food intake (by fasting, skipping meals or throwing away food) in the previous three months Continue reading

Will They Ever Leave? What It Takes To Nudge Millennials Out Of Nest

How do young adults who successfully move out overcome adversities? According to a new study, it all boils down to peer support. (ibm4381/Flickr)

How do young adults who successfully move out overcome adversities? According to a new study, it all boils down to peer support. (ibm4381/Flickr)

Truth be told, my position in life is somewhat confusing. While I’m no longer a teenager, at 21 I can’t say I feel all that adult-like. I’ve finished one degree, but I’m not ready to commit to any one career. I recently moved into my first apartment, though I have no idea where I’ll be living 10, five or even two years from now. According to developmental psychologists, these are all indicators that I am in my emerging adulthood.

But what exactly is “emerging adulthood”? It’s the period of life between adolescence and full-fledged adulthood, between the late teens and late 20s, where people explore their options before committing seriously to a career, home, or family. And according to experts, it’s happening later and later. Dr. Jeff Arnett of Clark University, who coined the term “emerging adulthood” in 2000, points to the fact that North Americans are delaying adopting a permanent residence until reaching their 30s.

The reasons are complex and diverse, Arnett says: they include a shift in the economy that necessitates more education, a rising marriage age and, more nebulously, an increased sense of personal freedom over the past several decades. All this makes conventional adulthood “a less attractive destination,” he says. (I’ll say.) And then there’s the job market, which makes the decision to move out even more complicated.

This doesn’t mean that today’s young adults aren’t feeling the itch for independence, however. Some friends of mine who remained at home after college say they “would’ve preferred to have gone elsewhere,” and cite being “treated like a child” by parents as both a positive reason why they stayed at home and a negative — why they didn’t want to be there. Fortunately, my parents conveyed confidence in my ability to live on my own. In moving out, I benefitted greatly from knowing my parents had my back, should I need financial or emotional support.

For foster-care children, the lack of a parental support system presents a huge issue. Professor Varda Mann-Feder knows this problem intimately, after having spent decades working with foster children as they transition into adulthood. But there may be good news for emerging adults in foster care: a new study headed by Mann-Feder and her colleagues at Concordia University shows that peer support systems could be even more important than parental support in facilitating the transition to independent living.

While parents played an important role in how confidently participants experienced the transition — particularly based on parents’ willingness to provide a financial safety net — Mann-Feder found that Millennials “much preferred to turn to their friends for help if they needed it,” and “benefit greatly from watching their peers who have already moved out.” Conversely, young adults who opted to stay in their childhood home pointed to friends who were doing the same. Because they tend to model their peers, “when, how and where a young person moves is to a large degree determined by what their friends are doing,” says Mann-Feder. Continue reading

Public Health Alert: One In 10 High Schoolers Hurt By Dates With Slaps, Strikes

A new study by Boston public health researchers paints a bleak portrait of the dating scene among young people: One in 10 high schoolers say they’ve been hit or otherwise physically hurt by someone they dated in the past year.

The study, published in the Journal of School Violence, found that “9.3 percent of U.S. high school students have been ‘hit, slapped, or physically hurt on purpose’ by a boyfriend or girlfriend in the past year – an annual prevalence rate that has not changed significantly in the past 12 years.”

“Dating violence is a big deal. It’s one of the more serious public health problems that high school students are facing,” says Emily Rothman, the study’s lead author and an associate professor at Boston University School of Public Health. ”But where it ranks in funding is not commensurate with how prevalent it is and how potentially harmful.”

Rothman says that several violence prevention programs have been shown to be effective, including one that trains middle and high school sports coaches to spend 15 minutes once a week at the end of practice talking to boys about healthy relationships with women and girls. Unfortunately, Rothman says, “too few schools have the support they need to implement these…programs.”

Here’s more from the BU news release:

HeatherKaiser/flickr

HeatherKaiser/flickr


Rothman and Ziming Xuan, faculty at Boston University, analyzed data from 100,901 students who participated in the national Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System survey (YRBSS) for the years 1999-2011. They found that 9.3 percent of U.S. high school students have been “hit, slapped, or physically hurt on purpose” by a boyfriend or girlfriend in the past year – an annual prevalence rate that has not changed significantly in the past 12 years.

The experience of being hit, slapped or otherwise physically hurt was reported at nearly equivalent rates by males and females who participated in the survey. There was a statistically significant increased rate of dating-violence victimization among black (12.9 percent) and multiracial (12.2 percent) youth, as compared to whites and Asians (8 percent) or Hispanic youth (10.5 percent). The rate of dating violence victimization remained stable over the 1999-2011 period for both males and females, and for each racial subgroup, despite a number of efforts to curb dating violence in the last decade. Continue reading

Insights On Why Some Girls Are Skirting The HPV Vaccine

Public health officials have been somewhat puzzled by low rates of HPV vaccination: only 54% of adolescent girls receive the first dose of the 3-part vaccine series, and only 33% complete it.

What gives? Doctors recommend it. It’s safe and effective. It has the potential to save thousands of lives every year. So why aren’t more people getting the HPV vaccine?

A young girl after getting the HPV vaccine

A young girl after getting the HPV vaccine

A new study by doctors and public health researchers at the University of Colorado sheds light on who remains unvaccinated and why. (While the full article has not yet been released, the authors recently presented their research with an abstract and poster.) It builds on previous findings that deserve mention: women of low socioeconomic status have the highest risk of developing cervical cancer because of their limited access to other preventative measures, like annual exams and pap smears. In other words, poor women need the HPV vaccine the most. But among the girls who begin the vaccine series, minorities and the impoverished are much less likely to complete it.

To find out why, the researchers, led by Sean O’Leary, MD, MPH, interviewed the parents of girls with an incomplete HPV vaccination. They recruited both English-speaking and Spanish-speaking parents for the study to see if there were any major differences in reasoning or access to care.

As it turns out, two big issues appear to be at play here: parents don’t understand the importance of completing the vaccine series, and healthcare providers aren’t following up about scheduling doses 2 and 3. Spanish-speaking parents had particular trouble with the latter; one parent reported that their provider was “not clear on when to get the next [shot in the series],” even though they wanted their daughter to complete the series “because we are responsible.”

What we’re looking at, it seems, is a bit of a break-down in doctor-patient communication. Continue reading

The Checkup: Meltdown U. And Mental Health Tips For Parents Of College Kids

For all those freshman just settling into dorm life this fall, college can be exhilarating, mind-blowing, the best years of their lives. But many parents don’t realize that their children are also facing a potential double whammy. Not only must new students navigate an entirely unfamiliar social, emotional and intellectual landscape, but they’re also entering a time in their lives — the ages between 18 and 21 — when many mental illnesses, from anxiety to depression to eating disorders, peak.

This week, The Checkup, our podcast on Slate, explores the mental health of college students. Here’s one sobering statistic: up to 50% of college-age kids have had or will have some kind of psychiatric disorder. That’s why we’re calling this episode “Meltdown U.” (To listen to The Checkup now, click on the arrow above; to download and listen later, press Download; and to get it through iTunes click here.)

The Checkup

Consider some more scary numbers:

–80% of college students who need mental health services won’t seek them

–50% of all college students say they have felt so depressed that they found it difficult to function during the last school year

–Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college-age youth – over 1000 deaths per year.

–The rate of student psychiatric hospitalizations has tripled in the past 20 years.

We asked Dr. Eugene Beresin, M.D., a child psychiatrist at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, to offer some guidance on what parents should know about helping their college-age kids cope with the high stress of undergraduate life. Here’s his advice: Continue reading

Summer Cramp: Marketing Tampons To The Bunk Set

Summer camp is a classic setting for coming-of-age adolescent adventures: the first unattainable crush on that dreamy Zinc-nosed counselor, the first meaningful bonding that only a shared canoe experience can bring and, for many young female campers, their first period.

The new feminine product delivery service Hello Flo released the video above that has som fun with the “first-period-at-camp” trope. The 1:47 video, which AdWeek named “ad of the day,” stars a former loner camper turned powerfully popular after becoming the first girl at camp to get her period — or the “red patch of courage” as she calls it. Her newfound authority as the militant “Camp Gyno” gets to her head propelling her to divvy out tampons amongst newly menstruating campers like they were cigarettes circulating through jail; she barks at a young cramp sufferer to “suck it up and deal with it; this is your life now.” Though she touts herself as a Joan of Arc among campers, the Camp Gyno can’t compete with Hello Flo’s menstrual supply shipment service timed perfectly with the girls’ cycles. (Indeed, for $16 you get enough regular tampons for a 4-5 day medium flow, a handful of pads, Pantiliners and treats!)

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

The video has already accrued close to 80,000 views and is generating a generally positive response. The Huffington Post called it “The Best Tampon Ad in the History of the World” and applauded the video for adopting a realistic look into menstruation – a rarity, it says, in the cannon of ads for feminine hygiene products:

Now we all know that historically, ads for tampons and panty liners have, shall we say, skirted the down and dirty realities of menstruation. I mean, how many of us have seen a tampon ad featuring a woman wearing white pants and decided to put that kind of ill-placed faith in a “feminine hygiene” product? Here’s my guess: zero, thank goodness. And while the ubiquitous “blue liquid” ads at least weren’t as insulting as the “Are You Sure I’ll Still Be a Virgin?” Tampax ads that seemed to run in every issue of Seventeen magazine for my entire adolescence, they were so off-target as to cause confusion

It’s 2013. Way past time we had some funny, delightful ads about tampons in general and the vagaries of impending womanhood in particular.