opioids

RECENT POSTS

Mystery Solved: Why That ‘Opioid-Induced Constipation’ Super Bowl Ad?


I imagined 100 million people all scratching their heads at the same time and saying, “Huh?”

The source of their bafflement: Why, among all the usual Super Bowl ads for cars and beers, is there a minute-long tale (watch it above) of a man who envies others — even a dog — their digestive regularity?

The voice-over describes his plight: “If you need an opioid to manage your chronic pain, you may be so constipated it feels like everyone can go…except you. Tried many things? Still struggling to find relief? You may have opioid induced constipation — OIC.”

The condition sounds straightforward enough, and the social media poop jokes were predictable enough. The mystery was: How does something that looks like a public service announcement about opioid constipation show up on the most expensive advertising real-estate around?

A skeptical friend sent over these queries: “Are there really enough people on opioids that they can justify paying for a Super Bowl commercial? Isn’t anyone on legitimate opioids in a doctor’s care and getting info about anti-constipation meds?”

First of all, yes, there are enough people on opioids. The U.S. Pain Foundation estimates on its OIC page that nearly 8 million people who are on opioids suffer from related constipation. And that estimate may well be low, said the foundation’s founder, Paul Gileno, because people don’t tend to seek care for constipation, they often just try to treat it with over-the-counter and natural remedies. The U.S. Pain Foundation is one of a half-dozen groups listed at the end of the ad as co-sponsors, and some of its funding comes from pharmaceutical companies.

Secondly, Gileno said, no, many doctors are not on top of opioid-related constipation. “We’d all love to assume it’s being take care of, but it’s really not,” he said — to the point that some patients even skip their opioid doses despite the added pain, just to try to cope with the constipation.

About three-quarters of pain management happens in primary care doctors’ offices, he said, and those typically brief visits are often so focused on alleviating pain that they do not delve into side effects. Patients may also fail to connect their pain medication with their constipation.

“Early on in my pain journey, I didn’t realize that was a side effect, and quite honestly, my primary care doctor didn’t know either, he didn’t bring it up to me,” Gileno said. “It was only when I was able to see a good pain management doctor that he knew that was a side effect.”

The point of the Super Bowl ad was to get a conversation going about this embarrassing but important aspect of pain treatment, Gileno said.

But Super Bowl conversation-starters do not come cheap. USA Today reports that a 30-second ad costs up to $5 million. On this list of sponsors, who has that kind of money? Yes, it’s the two pharmaceutical companies at the bottom: Continue reading

Analysis: Controversy Over CDC’s Proposed Opioid Prescribing Guidelines

OxyContin pills are arranged at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. in this 2013 file photo. Opioid drugs include OxyContin. (Toby Talbot/AP)

OxyContin pills are arranged at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. in this 2013 file photo. Opioid drugs include OxyContin. (Toby Talbot/AP)

Updated at 3 p.m.

By Judy Foreman

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently came out with controversial proposed guidelines for opioid prescribing through a process that critics say may harm pain patients and is based on relatively low-grade evidence.

One of those critics is Cindy Steinberg, national director of policy and advocacy for the U.S. Pain Foundation, a patient advocacy group which receives funding from opioid manufacturers. Steinberg said in an interview and in emails that she’s worried the guidelines may negatively impact patients suffering with severe pain. “I am concerned that if these guidelines go forward as they are now written, they will lead to further restrictions on access to opioids for people with unremitting pain who truly need them and take them responsibly,” she said.

Dr. Jane Ballantyne, president of the non-profit Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing (PROP), which is part of a larger group involved in the guidelines process, said in a telephone interview that the worry about limited access to opioids for chronic pain patients is a “very legitimate fear.” But, she added: “We don’t want to reduce access for people already dependent on opioids. The guidelines are designed to not have so many people dependent on opioids in the future…”

Ballantyne said that the new guidelines are similar to previous guidelines with two key exceptions: lower dose limitations and the recommendation that, for acute pain not related to major surgery or trauma, opioids should be prescribed for only three days.

The month-long period for public comment on the proposed guidelines will be over Jan. 13.

A major concern of some critics is the lack of solid evidence backing up the guidelines, which give recommendations on prescribing practices; they include when to start opioids, how to establish treatment goals, how to discuss risks and benefits, recommended limitations on drug doses, duration of treatment and other issues. Continue reading

Exploring The Link Between Chronic Pain And Suicide

By Judy Foreman

This week’s grim report about rising suicide and overall death rates among white, middle-aged Americans contains a slim silver lining. Here it is:

The new analysis by two Princeton economists, Anne Case and Angus Deaton, suggests that chronic pain — and the opioids used to treat it — may be a key driver of the rising deaths. While the “noisy” opioid epidemic has garnered near-daily headlines across the country for several years now, the equally horrible but silent epidemic of chronic pain has not yet broken through into the nation’s consciousness. Maybe things are beginning to change.

Many people still don’t realize it, but 100 million American adults live with chronic pain, many of them with pain so bad it wrecks their work, their families, their mental health and their lives.

There are no hard data on how many people with chronic pain die by suicide every year. But there are inferences. The suicide rate among people with chronic pain is known to be roughly twice that for people without chronic pain.

(jennifer durban/Flickr)

(jennifer durban/Flickr)

Since there are 41,149 suicides every year in the U.S., according to the National Center for Health Statistics,  it’s possible that roughly half of these suicides are driven by pain. Not proven fact, but plausible hypothesis. This would suggest that perhaps up to 20,000 Americans a year with chronic pain kill themselves, which would be more than the government’s tally of 16,235 deaths from prescription opioids every year.  According to a CDC spokeswoman:

In 2013, there were 8,257 deaths that involved heroin and 16,235 deaths that involved prescription opioids. These categories are not mutually exclusive: if a decedent had both a prescription opioid as well as heroin listed on their death certificate, their death is counted in both the heroin as well as the prescription opioid death categories.

The truth, of course, is devilishly difficult to figure out with any certainty. Many people in severe, chronic pain have, and should have, opioids available. But unless they leave a suicide note it’s virtually impossible to tell if they overdose on purpose or accidentally. That’s in stark contrast to a pain patient who ends his or her life using a gun. That’s clearly a suicide, with or without a note.

In the course of researching my 2014 book on chronic pain, I heard many grisly stories. One Salt Lake City truck driver I interviewed would be dead today if his wife hadn’t walked in on him with a gun in his mouth. He had been in severe headache pain and after many visits to the ER, was repeatedly dismissed as a drug seeker, even without a medical workup. (Eventually, he was diagnosed with two brain aneurysms, bulging weak spots in a blood vessel). Continue reading

CDC: Risks Loom As Many Women Of Child-Bearing Age Are Prescribed Painkillers

Source: CDC

Source: CDC

The U.S. Centers For Disease Control and Prevention reports that many women of child-bearing age (notably, women on Medicaid) are taking opioid pain medications and that these drugs taken during pregnancy can increase the risk of birth defects.

According to the agency’s latest Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report:

During 2008–2012, more than one fourth of privately insured and more than one third of Medicaid enrolled reproductive-aged women (15–44 years) filled a prescription for an opioid from an outpatient pharmacy each year. Prescription rates were consistently higher among Medicaid-enrolled compared with privately insured women.

The most frequently prescribed opioids, says the CDC, were hydrocodone, codeine and oxycodone.

The report details why early exposure is particularly risky:

“The development of birth defects often results from exposures during the first few weeks of pregnancy, which is a critical period for organ formation. Given that many pregnancies are not recognized until well after the first few weeks and half of all U.S. pregnancies are unplanned, all women who might become pregnant are at risk.”

Continue reading

Memo To Gov.-Elect: Include Pain Sufferers As You Seek Opiate Solution

(tudedude via Compfight)

(tudedude via Compfight)

By Cindy Steinberg
Guest contrbutor

Cindy Steinberg is the policy chair for the Massachusetts Pain Initiative and the national director of policy and advocacy for the U.S. Pain Foundation.

Charlie Baker vows to tackle state opiate problem,” was the Boston Globe headline two days after Election Day.

It’s good to hear from our newly elected governor that he plans to take steps to curb the ongoing problem with illegal use of prescription medication in our state. There’s little doubt that too many lives are being harmed by drug abuse and addiction.

But in a quest to fix one problem, policymakers need to consider the potential unintended negative consequences for the patients for whom these medications are a lifeline.

Cindy Steinberg (courtesy)

Cindy Steinberg (courtesy)

Gov.-elect Baker said in that Globe interview that he plans to convene a coalition of lawmakers, health care providers and labor leaders to confront the opioid crisis in our state. Representatives of the pain community — an estimated 1.2 million Massachusetts residents live with chronic pain — must be included in these discussions as well.

For many with chronic pain, the right medications mean the difference between a life worth living or not.

But despite these legitimate needs, more and more I’m hearing from residents of our state who are unable to access treatment that their doctors say they need and that they depend on. These are not addicts; these are people who are trying to manage their lives with debilitating conditions such as cancer, diabetic neuropathy, sickle cell, daily migraine, fibromyalgia, severe back pain and many others.

These are not addicts; these are people who are trying to manage their lives with debilitating conditions such as cancer, diabetic neuropathy, sickle cell, daily migraine, fibromyalgia.

Not including members of the pain community in discussions about how these medications are prescribed, regulated and controlled marginalizes the lives of thousands of Massachusetts citizens who live with pain caused by a myriad of conditions and serious injuries.

There is not a silver bullet solution to solving the abuse of prescription drugs. We need to take a thoughtful, multifaceted approach to ensure that those who need pain medication have access to it, and that those who choose to abuse these medications are stopped. There is no group more invested in making sure that medications are responsibly controlled than members of the pain community. Continue reading

Mass. Substance Abuse Bill Responds To Tide Of Sadness And Fear

Massachusetts State House (Wikimedia Commons)

Massachusetts State House (Wikimedia Commons)

In response to stories that seem to be on the rise in communities across the state — stories of parents trying to revive children after a heroin overdose, of young people seeking treatment their insurance plan won’t cover, and of babies born addicted to opiates — state lawmakers on the last day of their formal session approved a bill they say will help save the lives of those addicted to heroin, prescription painkillers and alcohol.

The measure, among several major bills passed just after midnight Friday, requires insurers to pay for any care a doctor decides is medically necessary. Insurers say this and other requirements included in the bill are a mistake.

In outlining the House and Senate compromise on the substance abuse bill Thursday afternoon, Sen. John Keenan of Quincy talked about his father.

“He was a good, decent, hard-working man, he was a great husband, a great father, but he was an alcoholic.” Keenan remembered an afternoon when his family told his father he had to get help. His dad resisted, but finally agreed. Someone got on the phone and found him a bed in a treatment program that was paid for by the Keenan’s insurance plan.

“That very day changed lives. My father had 26 years of sobriety before he passed away last year,” Keenan said. “He had 26 years with my mother, 26 years as a great father, 26 years with his seven children and their spouses, and 26 years as a great papa to his 20 grandchildren. So this can work.”

“This” being a requirement that insurers pay for up to 14 days of overnight detox and rehabilitation treatment as well as counseling, medication and any other services a clinician says are “medically necessary.”

Continue reading

As Mass. Lawmakers Take Up Addiction Bill, What’s Most Effective Treatment?

Hydrocodone pills, also known as Vicodin. (Toby Talbot/AP)

Hydrocodone pills, also known as Vicodin. (Toby Talbot/AP)

As Massachusetts lawmakers work on differences in the $20 million bill designed to address the state’s opioid crisis, questions remain about which treatments are best.

Several business and insurance leaders have written to Gov. Deval Patrick saying that some parts of the bill may not encourage the most effective addiction treatment. Essentially, they say, more beds may not be the answer, but more medication and longer outpatient care might be better.

The House bill requires insurers to pay for at least 10 inpatient days of addiction treatment if that’s determined to be medically necessary; the Senate bill requires up to 21 days of inpatient coverage.

“We just believe patients should have a choice.”

– Leominster Sen. Jennifer Flanagan

But the American Society of Addiction Medicine estimates that 95 percent of opioid-dependent patients do not need inpatient care, and might be better off with medication maintenance and several months of outpatient therapy. Lawmakers maintain that they do not want to mandate any form of treatment.

“If we have this epidemic that continues to grow, we’re essentially in uncharted territory, and current treatment options aren’t working,” said Leominster Sen. Jennifer Flanagan, one of the bill’s co-sponsors. “If people want inpatient treatment or medication maintenance, they should be able to decide that with their doctors.”

At the same time, a new report contains some surprising findings about medication maintenance addiction treatment. It says that methadone, long used to treat heroin addiction, may be the most effective and cheapest treatment.

The report, from The New England Comparative Effectiveness Public Advisory Council, found that when comparing methadone with suboxone (Buprenorphine) or naltrexone (Vivitrol), more patients stayed in treatment longer if they were taking methadone. Continue reading

Mass. Receives Mixed Marks On Painkiller Prescription Report

Massachusetts ranks in the top 10 of all states for prescribing OxyContin and other long-acting painkillers, but in the bottom 10 for overall prescribing of opioids.

That’s according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The report, based on 2012 data, says Massachusetts ranks eighth in long-acting painkiller prescription rates and ninth in the use of the sedative benzodiazepine.

“State variation in prescribing shows us that the overprescribing of opioids can be reduced safely and feasibly,” said Daniel Sosin, acting director of CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, in a statement. “Improving how opioids are prescribed will help us prevent the 46 prescription painkiller overdose deaths that occur each day in the United States.”

Continue reading

Opinion: Why Zohydro Ban Is A Tough Call

Update 4/15:

The AP reports that a federal judge blocked Massachusetts from banning the powerful new painkiller Zohydro.

U.S. District Court Judge Rya Zobel on Tuesday issued the preliminary injunction after the maker of the drug, Zogenix, said in a lawsuit that the ban ordered by Gov. Deval Patrick was unconstitutional.

Zobel said in issuing the injunction that Massachusetts appears to have overstepped its authority in banning the drug, which had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Patrick ordered the ban after declaring a public health emergency in light of widespread prescription drug abuse in the state.

The judge said federal law preempted the state’s order.

By Judy Foreman
Guest contributor

U.S. District Court Judge Rya W. Zobel today disappointed anyone who expected her to quickly strike down Gov. Deval Patrick’s ban on the sale of the new pain reliever Zohydro. She declined to rule on the drugmaker’s request to quickly but temporarily lift the ban, and is continuing to consider whether to lift the ban permanently.

Judge Zobel faces a difficult decision but not because Zohydro, as many media reports have said, is more potent than anything else on the market. It’s not, and we’ll get to that in a minute.

(wikimedia commons)

(Wikimedia Commons)

First, the legalities. It should be up to federal health officials, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, not governors, to make decisions about the safety (or lack thereof) of drugs. For better or worse, the FDA, after a long 2013 review, and against the vote of its own advisory committee, did approve Zohydro in October of last year.

Legally, and logically, it also made little sense in the first place – except politically — for a governor to focus on one particular drug when the whole class of drugs to which it belongs — opioids, also known as narcotics – is controversial precisely because that whole class of drugs has such a complex mix of risks and benefits.

In truth, Zohydro is probably not the wonder drug that its manufacturer, Zogenix, claims, nor is it the menace that critics assert. The furor over Zohydro is simply the latest example of how difficult it is to balance the legitimate needs of people in chronic pain who need long-acting opioids and the also-legitimate need to protect vulnerable people from getting their hands on drugs they might abuse.

The unique feature of extended-release Zohydro is that it contains the opioid hydrocodone, and only hydrocodone. Continue reading

Second Opinion: Doc Says Blue Cross Opioid Policy Is Flawed

Amidst concerns over a massive national increase in the use and abuse of prescription painkillers, health insurer Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts instituted a new policy to reduce pain medication addiction and misuse.

This week The Boston Globe reports that as a result of the new policy, Blue Cross has cut prescriptions of narcotic painkillers by an estimated 6.6 million pills in 18 months.

But Daniel P. Alford, MD, an associate professor of Medicine and director of the Safe and Competent Opioid Prescribing Education (SCOPE of Pain) Program at Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, calls the policy “flawed and irresponsible.” Here’s Alford’s response:

By Dr. Daniel P. Alford
Guest Contributor

The Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts opioid management program was implemented to provide members with “appropriate pain care” and reduce the risk of opioid addiction and diversion.

In a recent Boston Globe report they claim “very significant success” with this program after 18 months because they have cut opioid prescriptions by 6.6 million pills.

Dr. Dan Alford

Dr. Dan Alford

Is this really a measure of success and if so, for whom? It likely saves Blue Cross money but has it successfully achieved their program’s stated goals? Does decreased opioid prescribing mean more appropriate pain care? Does decreased opioid prescribing reduce the risk of addiction or diversion, or does it decrease access to a specific pain medication (opioids) for treating legitimate chronic pain? Is the observed decrease in opioid prescribing evidence that opioids have been overprescribed, as Blue Cross claims, or is it proof that instituting a barrier to opioid prescribing (prior authorization) will decrease prescribing even for legitimate need? Are patients with chronic pain really benefiting from this program? I doubt it.

Adding yet more paperwork for physicians will not improve pain care, decrease addiction or the numbers of accidental overdoses from prescription opioids. Those physicians who are unwilling (or ambivalent) to prescribe opioids even when indicated will use the prior authorization requirement as an excuse to continue not prescribing. Those who are overly liberal in prescribing will figure out the most efficient way to satisfy the insurance requirements for approvals. Physicians who responsibly prescribe opioids – that is, prescribing them only when the benefits outweigh any risks — will be saddled with more administrative burdens to justify their well thought-out treatment decisions.

Some physicians may ultimately decide that prescribing opioids isn’t worth the trouble despite known benefits for some patients. Continue reading