sex reassignment surgery

RECENT POSTS

Answers To Your Sex, Language And Transgender Medical Questions

We wrap up our series on living transgender with your questions from our Friday live chat:

Why are so many young people comfortable with the idea of “genderqueer”?
How’s sex after sex reassignment surgery?
Which sports team do transgender students play on?

Answers from you and the panelists follow.

0121_trans-live-chat

From left to right: Unger, Moureau and Levi. (Courtesy)

Dr. Cecile Unger, OB/GYN who trained at Brigham and Women’s and Massachusetss General Hospital and is currently a fellow at the Cleveland Clinic where she is training in Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery and developing a subspecialty in transgender women’s surgery and health.

Bianca Moureau, transgender advocate. A former patient at Boston Children’s Hospital, Bianca transitioned from male to female when she was 14. She was the first person in the country to have Medicaid pay for her surgery. Now 26, Bianca is applying to law school.

Jennifer Levi, runs the Transgender Rights Project at GLAD and specializes in transgender legal issues.

Question from Margaret: Is there an age cutoff for surgery? That is, can someone be “too old” for gender-changing surgery? I have a good friend, born male, who has been transitioning to female for about two years now. She’s in her mid-50s and has been taking hormones most of that time.

Response from Cecile Unger: Margaret, as someone who sees these patients, I can say that there is absolutely no age cut-off.ne-third of patients discover their identity later in life while some patients choose to wait. Many individuals undergo surgery in late adulthood.

Comment From Kelly: [I ] would love to hear you discuss the concept of “genderqueer” and the generational divide. Continue reading

Does Sex Reassignment Surgery Really Boost Mental Health?

Michelle L. Kosilek, pictured in this Jan. 15, 1993 file photo, is a transgender inmate serving life in prison for murder. U.S. District Judge Mark Wolf ruled in Sept. 2012 that sex-reassignment surgery is the only adequate treatment for Kosilek’s gender-identity disorder, which he found was a “serious medical need.” Kosilek was named Robert when married to Cheryl Kosilek. He was convicted of killing her in 1990. (Lisa Bul/AP, file)

Read Judy Foreman’s thoughtful piece on Cognescenti this morning about the research behind sex reassignment surgery and whether it truly improves a patient’s overall mental health (bottom line: not so much). Foreman concludes that “the surgery eases deep unhappiness with one’s biological sex. But it doesn’t seem to help much with other mental health issues, including suicidality.”

Foreman reports that Ben Klein, senior attorney for Gay and Lesbian Advocates and Defenders, views the surgery in a more positive light:

“All studies have limitations,” he told me, “but if you look at the overwhelming trend of a significant number of studies, all point to the same conclusion – that sex reassignment surgery is the only effective treatment for gender identity disorder.”

But I’m not buying that — pooling a bunch of bad studies doesn’t yield good data.

Continue reading