STDs

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To Turn Undergrads On To Sex-Ed: Phallic Name Tags And Orgasm Trivia

Attention-grabbing nametags at a sex-ed event for undergrads (Photo: Sascha Garrey)

Attention-grabbing nametags at a sex-ed event for undergrads (Photo: Sascha Garrey)

By Sascha Garrey
Guest contributor

How do you get busy undergrads to focus on their sexual health? Try penis name tags.

That was among the many strategies deployed this week at a sex-themed trivia night organized by the Boston University Health and Wellness Office.

Diners who went to the Sunset Cantina just for the Mexican food on a recent evening were in for a surprise. Amidst the usual busy hum of this popular night spot, the thunderstorm of phrases like “female orgasm” and “pus-like discharge” booming continually across the restaurant may have shocked some into choking on their tacos.

The Cantina played host to BU’s sex-ed evening, ”Sex at the Sunset”: students sporting comical penis-shaped name tags were spread around the venue, talking excitedly and sipping drinks from pink, labia-inspired straws.

A team of peer-health educators, known as the BU Student Health Ambassadors (SHAs), partnered with Bedsider — a pro-sex health outreach organization that advocates for the responsible use of birth control — to bring this racy, but informative, event aimed at BU students as a casual and amusing opportunity to learn and talk about sex.

Meilyn Santamaria, a senior at BU majoring in health sciences and one of the SHAs, helped organize the event and was also the mastermind behind the mood enhancing playlist – hot, throwback tunes like “Sexual Healing” and “Like a Virgin” were thumping all night.

Santamaria has learned a thing or two as a peer-health educator. For instance, she says, approaches to sex-ed like this light, fun-filled evening are important because they engage kids on a different level; and they sure beat those dry, awkward gym class lectures on hygiene.

“You actually get to interact with the material,” says Santamaria. “It’s exciting, it’s fun, it’s a safe environment that is a less intimidating way for people to learn this kind of important information about sex.” Continue reading

Confessions Of A Herpes Sufferer Turned Activist

Even though it’s a good bet that some of your best friends, neighbors and family members have herpes (overall prevalence by the time people reach their forties is 26%) it’s still a huge taboo.

It certainly was for Jenelle Marie, diagnosed with herpes 14 years ago and later, with a slew of other sexually transmitted diseases. In a new post on Our Bodies Our Blog, she describes the intense psychological stress of living with an STD and how, over time, as she learned the facts about her own condition, she overcame much of the social stigma. It wasn’t easy.

A lab image of herpes virus

A lab image of herpes virus

Here’s Marie on her initial diagnosis by a not-so-sympathetic doctor:

At 16, when our family doctor peered at me with a lazy eye, through thick glasses, and accompanied by a partially missing ear to tell me my genital herpes outbreak was the worst case he’d ever seen, I was devastated. Embarrassment coursed through me as he handed me a prescription and sent my mother and me on our way – sans brochures, additional information, and references to resources, support groups or even a mention of the vast number of people living with an STI everywhere. I was a pariah – a leper – even the doctor was disgusted by my condition.

For years, I accepted my fate and considered myself as being punished for having been sexually active before marriage. As a high-schooler, I was called a slut or a whore and “friends” of mine forewarned men who took interest in me that I would merely infect them, hurt them, and they should steer clear entirely. I actually maintained some of those friendships for a period of time, not knowing otherwise about STIs and those who contract them, thinking myself deserving of such treatment.

Now, she’s an activist, Continue reading