Elderly Man (Me) Found In Snow With Punctured Lung But Still, At 79, I Ski

Author Ralph Gilbert, who suffered a punctured lung in a ski accident, and his son, Keith, his rescuer (Courtesy)

Author Ralph Gilbert, who suffered a punctured lung in a ski accident, and his son, Keith, his rescuer (Courtesy)

By Ralph M. Gilbert
Guest Contributor

Traumatic pneumothorax: the presence of air or gas in the pleural cavity, which impairs ventilation and oxygenation, caused by a severe trauma to the chest or lung wall. Symptoms are often severe, and can contribute to fatal complications such as cardiac arrest, respiratory failure, and shock.

Every time I tried to lift my head the sky began to spin. Then I felt the nausea. I knew that I had to get up out of the snow but after a few attempts, I just lay back, exhausted. Suddenly, a spray of powder was kicked onto my face as a young ski patrolwoman executed a hurried skid stop. She bent down and put her cold face next to mine:

“Sir,” she said looking into my unfocused eyes. “Are you all right? Do you know where you are, sir? Where are you, sir?”

“Huh?”

I realized that she wasn’t asking a particularly hard question, but I just couldn’t come up with an answer.

“I don’t know,” I replied.

She helped me to my feet.I looked around and saw the other skiers.

“I’m skiing…right?”

She radioed for help. The next thing I knew, I was being leaned back into a toboggan. Fighting the nausea and afraid that I would have to throw up, I asked to be tipped over momentarily before they restrained me to the sled for my ride down.

I regained consciousness in a strange hospital ER.

A young woman was standing over me. She asked: “Do you really think, sir, that a man of your age should be skiing alone in the glades?”

I hated that question. I found it particularly humiliating. As an intrepid, former U.S. Army trooper, I didn’t want to be talked to that way, especially by a woman who asked me the same questions my wife often asked.

Tests indicated a concussion. Upon release, I was told to buy a new helmet (each helmet can absorb only one crash), and not to ski for a week. I took only one day off, which I thought was plenty. I then purchased a new helmet and two days later I was back up on my skis again.

My next accident a few years later was to be worse, much worse.

Age denial? Not So Much

Before I tell you that story, I’d like to note that I’m not in total age denial. Now 79, I spend less and less of my après-ski time trading embellished ski stories with my buddies in smoky bars. These days, when we go on our annual ski trip, I can be found at night alone in my little room, carefully applying ice packs and winding compression bandages around my ill-treated joints.

I reject the idea, however, that I am suffering from any age-related diminution of muscle tone, balance or endurance. My ski dreams are still intact even if my body is not. I do realize that I should avoid the super steep double black diamond trails that I once traversed. But I just can’t resist.

Why? By story’s end, I’ll try to explain.

Male Bonding

Each year, twelve of us, former army buddies at Fort Bliss, Texas go on a ski trip together. We had trained as Nike Missile crewmen back in 1958 during the Cold War. Our job was to join with others to protect the City of New York.Stationed in a darkened radar van, we were to monitor our radar screens for Russian bombers. Our Nike Missiles were buried in concrete shafts near us. Our vantage point was Spring Valley, New York, which otherwise is known for kosher chickens and Hassids. If we saw any Russians in the air we were to electronically challenge them, then shoot them down. Continue reading

2014: CommonHealth Year Of The Brain, From Depression To Dyslexia

 

A map of nerve fibers in the human brain (. (Courtesy of Zeynep Saygin/Massachusetts Institute of Technology.)

A map of nerve fibers in the human brain (. (Courtesy of Zeynep Saygin/Massachusetts Institute of Technology.)

Happy almost 2015. Instead of doing our usual “Top 10 CommonHealth stories of the year” post, we’ve decided instead to look back at our tip-top, far-and-away #1 organ of the year for 2014.

Hint: It’s well above the waist. The brain is, to quote Pink Floyd: “All that you touch/All that you see/All that you taste/All you feel./All that you love/All that you hate/All you distrust/All you save.”

Etcetera. The brain is also the focus of some of the most fascinating research in modern-day science.

Our 2014 series, “Brain Matters: Reporting from the Front Lines of Neuroscience,” tried to capture a partial snapshot of this pivotal moment in brain science, a time of new tools and insights so promising that scientists themselves are saying this is the most exciting time ever to work on the brain.

The series included the set of gorgeous images below, compiled by former intern Suzanne E. Jacobs, and a collection of short video interviews with young neuroscientists, produced by WBUR’s Jesse Costa: 11 Young Neuroscientists Share Their Cutting Edge Research.

The individual “Brain Matters” pieces, in reverse chronological order:

Wishing you a wonderful new year. Special thanks to WBUR’s Iris Adler, who supervised the “Brain Matters” series. And now, for your visual pleasure, the wondrous view inside your head: Continue reading

State Reports 40,000 Health Connector Signups By Deadline

Massachusetts officials say about 40,000 people met a deadline for enrolling through the state’s Health Connector for insurance starting on Jan. 1.

The enrollment deadline was Tuesday, though the state gave people who have selected a health care plan but not yet paid their first month’s premium an extension until Sunday to do so.

In addition to the 40,065 who have signed up and paid, another 34,138 have selected plans but not made payments. A spokeswoman for the Connector says some have transitional coverage that runs through January, so may not be required to pay by Jan. 1 to avoid a gap in coverage.

Officials say nearly 235,000 people have determined their eligibility for coverage under the Affordable Care act since the state’s revamped website launched on Nov. 15.

Earlier:

Embrace The Eggnog, And Other Tips To Curb Holiday Eating (And Guilt)

(Theen Moy/Flickr)

(Theen Moy/Flickr)

It’s peak season for overeating — and then beating yourself up for doing it.

Clearly, you’re not the only one treating yourself to pumpkin and pecan pie, egg nog and, yes, fruitcake. Yet it’s no comfort that everyone else and their Weight Watchers’ leader is also riddled with guilt and enduring a personal thrashing for the extra calories and potential weight gain. While this self-flagellation goes on, you’re missing out on enjoying the holidays.

If only there were a better approach to holiday eating, maybe then you’d be able to stop beating yourself up, enjoy eating what you love and savor everything else you really do love about this season.

Happily, you don’t need an emergency gastric bypass to stop the vicious cycle: putting an end to both overeating and self-criticism might be easier than you think. It might be as easy as reviewing some research-based strategies honed from a group training I lead for people with eating issues. It revolves around practicing a variety of mindful eating and self-compassion meditations.

Here are five proven tips for happier, healthier holiday eating:

1. Redefine Holiday Eating

You’ll need a better working definition of “normal holiday eating” if your definition sounds anything like my esteemed colleague and family eating expert Ellyn Satter’s:

Most people get caught up in what they should and shouldn’t eat. They’re anxious and ambivalent about eating. They might try to resist at holiday parties, but the table is laden with ‘forbidden food,’ and they throw away all control and overdo it. Many times they’re over-hungry because they’re trying to restrict themselves and lose weight. So the standard definition of holiday eating becomes eating way too much.

If you’d prefer to take fewer bites and ease the anxiety and ambivalence, now’s the time to do the exact the opposite, starting with eating regular meals and snacks. Then, come party-time, permit yourself to eat the foods you enjoy. You’re probably going to eat them anyway, so you might as well as enjoy them, without the guilt and other uncomfortable emotions that predictably fuel emotional eating.

2. Go Easier On Yourself

If, like most dieters, you’re hoping that feeding yourself a steady diet of self-criticism will inspire you to rein in your eating, think again. You’ve actually got it backward. Self-criticism — calling yourself fat, disgusting and other mean, nasty names — is really a recipe for emotional overeating and holiday weight gain. Continue reading

Health Connector Site Handles Last-Minute Signee Load

Massachusetts residents signing up for health plans endured hour-long waits over the phone ahead of Wednesday’s midnight deadline.

But online, the state’s website handled the last-minute load.

The revamped Health Connector website did not suffer the same outages and delays as last year. Thousands of people without insurance through their employers were able to sign up for health plans during the day. To ease the demand on the call center, Connector official Maydad Cohen extended the deadline to pay for those plans.

“Given the heavy interest in signing up for January 1 coverage, we will accept online and paper payments through Sunday, December 28,” he said.

The Health Connector call center will be open on Sunday to help those who did enroll by yesterday’s deadline, but still have to set up payment for their health insurance.

Related:

Quincy Medical Center’s Closure Set For Friday

The Department of Public Health on Tuesday signed off on the proposed closure of Quincy Medical Center, set for midnight on Friday.

Steward Health Care, the owner of the hospital, said Quincy Medical will halt operations on Dec. 26, at 11:59 p.m., with a satellite emergency facility set to open in the same location at 12 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 27.

“Because of significant declines in patient volume, the Department has determined that this closure timeline is necessary and appropriate to protect the health and safety of patients served by QMC and the Department waives the remainder of the 90 day closure notice period,” Department of Public Health official Sherman Lohnes wrote in a Tuesday letter to Steward.

In a release, Steward said that Quincy Medical as of Tuesday no longer has any inpatients.

“We are appreciative of the thoughtful review of our transition plan and the guidance we received from the Department of Public Health,” Mark Girard, president of Steward Hospitals, said in a statement.

Local elected officials have criticized Steward for the speed with which the for-profit company has moved to close the hospital after it claimed in November that it suffered financial losses and a decreasing number of patients at the Quincy hospital. Attorney General Martha Coakley’s office has also raised the prospect of legal action in response to the closure.

The closure was originally set for Dec. 31, and then Steward said it would be willing to keep it open up to Feb. 4, 2015.

Continue reading

Earlier:

Health Connector Extends Payment Deadline

Massachusetts residents signing up for health insurance through the state have a few more days to make their first payment, but must still enroll before midnight tonight to guarantee their coverage begins Jan. 1.

State officials behind the Health Connector website say it has been working well as thousands use it to sign up ahead of Tuesday’s midnight enrollment deadline, but phone wait times have been about an hour. To ease the crush, Connector official Maydad Cohen is extending the payment deadline until Sunday.

“I want to be very clear here: consumers must still select and check out a plan by midnight tonight, Dec. 23,” Cohen said.

The Health Connector call center will be open on Sunday to help those taking advantage of the deadline extension for payments.

Earlier:

‘Tis The Season Of Stress: 10 Tips To Help You Cope

Happy Holidays! (Courtesy of Gene Beresin)

Happy Holidays! (Courtesy of Gene Beresin)

By Steve Schlozman, M.D. and Gene Beresin, M.D.
Guest Contributors

Imagine this fairly common holiday scene: You’re driving up and down the aisles in a very busy parking lot. There have been a few near misses, cars pulling out of briefly empty spaces, but there’s always someone waiting for that space, getting there just a second before you. Your car is a cacophony of seasonal torment: The pop music on the radio mercilessly full of holiday cheer, your little one in the car seat with a runny nose, your school-aged kid kicking the back of your seat and your teenager sitting with her legs on the dashboard while she sullenly tunes you out in favor of her iPod and its noise-cancelling earphones.

‘Tis the season…

Study after study shows us that the holidays are stressful for both parents and kids. (Like we needed a study?) People are cranky, irritable, rushed and unruly. All of us await the holidays with great anticipation and high expectations — family, fun, presents, togetherness. And these experiences are reinforced by the multitude of ads we all see on TV. Yet, for most of us, there are immeasurable stresses.

The stress can be about almost anything: the guests, the gifts, the recents divorces or deaths.

And people with psychiatric disorders often have an even harder time. Depression and substance abuse worsen, and suicide attempts appear to increase. Don’t misunderstand — the holidays are also wonderful, but we’d be fooling ourselves if we ignored the yearly misery that the holidays can potentially engender.

So, how do we navigate these frenzied days and stay on an even keel?

It turns out that there are some things we can do to manage the tough times, and though many of these things seem obvious, it’s their very obviousness that often causes us to forget. Here are 10 tips to remember:

1. Pace Yourself (if possible)

Adults and children rarely do well when they’re rushed. Kids detect the panicked demeanor of their parents, and parents then get irritable when their anxious kids act out. So, don’t do everything at once. Continue reading

Art As A Conversation About Cancer With ‘Anyone Who Will Listen’

"Adjusted Schedule" by Dennis Svoronos (Courtesy of the artist) (Click to enlarge)

“Adjusted Schedule” by Dennis Svoronos (Courtesy of the artist) (Click to enlarge)

Art, in its essence, is just another way to tell a story, a way for humans to make meaning out of their experiences. At Health Story Collaborative, a nonprofit founded by Dr. Annie Brewster, a Boston internist and CommonHealth contributor who uses storytelling in a therapeutic context, artists are invited to tell their unique stories.

Here, Dennis Svoronos, a Boston-based sculptor who describes his work as existing “between art and engineering,” reflects on his cancer as a force for creativity and social engagement.

By Dennis Svoronos

In September of 2009 — at 26 years of age — I was diagnosed with cancer after experiencing the first of many seizures. Of all the trials I could imagine that lay ahead, I never thought most of them would be exercises in recollection.

Patient name? Dennis Svoronos (thankfully I can always get this one)

Date of birth? 3/8/83 (a palindrome, helps to keep it easy)

Occupation? Artist (maybe not my parents first choice)

Approximate date of last surgery? 11/09 (Who forgets their first brain surgery)

Existing medical conditions? Anaplastic Astrocytoma (a cancerous brain tumor)

Repeat daily, for years.

"Just in Case" by Dennis Svoronos (Courtesy of the artist)

“Just in Case” by Dennis Svoronos (Courtesy of the artist) (Click to enlarge)

As time progressed; I remember those waiting rooms — questions and ID tags — much more than the operating theatre and injections; trauma is kind of like that.

However, they made me feel intrinsically linked to my disease. What was I, without these suffixes of sickness to identify with? Somehow, all my other unique and admirable qualities were set aside for the identifier of ‘cancer patient’.

It’s easy to resign to the belief that those forms and wristbands define your life, mere statistics, data — you and your cancer. Just as painless is to ignore the process completely, pretending your exams and operations are the bad dreams of another person, your ‘real life’ goes on unaffected.

Either way, it seems you’re not to talk openly about cancer, and it is difficult for most; patients, family and doctors alike. My initial sense was, it would be easier for me — and more comfortable for others — to keep off the topic. Sickness is a surprisingly taboo subject in a very liberal culture.

The artist in me, however, couldn’t stop questioning why we hide from the discussion. Continue reading

Health Connector: Insurance Signups Up, But Many Unpaid

The Massachusetts Health Connector is preparing for a signup surge as the state’s deadline for enrolling in 2015 insurance coverage approaches.

The agency says more than 100,000 residents who must pay some or all of their premiums have registered online, but so far, only 18 percent have chosen a plan and paid.

Still, those 18,000 people are double the number who had paid a week ago.

The deadline is Tuesday for those who want to be covered on the first of the year. The site’s director, Maydad Cohen, is urging residents to take action this weekend.

“Because we expect high, high volumes Monday and Tuesday,” Cohen said. “High volume typically results in longer wait times. And we do want to make sure people can access health insurance, and make sure that they pick and pay for that plan.”

The Connector office will be open during the day for residents who do not have access to a computer.

Earlier: