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Study Raises Questions About Military Service Causing Chronic Suicidal Tendencies

A new study commissioned by the U.S. Army has found that the mental health of soldiers isn’t as different from civilians as the researchers previously thought.

Earlier this year, researchers said that soldiers, who were surveyed at different times during their Army careers, had higher rates of mental disorders before they enlisted than the rates of mental illness in the general population.

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Uber Pilots Program To Bring Flu Shots To Your Door

In this April 3, 2014 photo, a smartphone is mounted on the glass of an Uber car in Mumbai, India. Riding on its startup success and flush with fresh capital, taxi-hailing smartphone app Uber is making a big push into Asia. The company has in the last year started operating in 18 cities in Asia and the South Pacific including Seoul, Shanghai, Bangkok, Hong Kong and five Indian cities. (Rafiq Maqbool/AP)

A smartphone with the Uber app is mounted on the glass of an Uber driver. (Rafiq Maqbool/AP)

If you used Uber in Boston today, you may have noticed a new feature. The car service company was offering what it calls UberHEALTH to bring free flu shots to users’ doors.

The service was part of a one-day pilot program in Boston, New York and Washington D.C., the company announced on its blog.
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Colleges Are Inconsistent In Handling Athlete Concussions, Harvard Study Finds

Colleges remain inconsistent in the way they handle athletes’ concussions, according to a Harvard University study that comes more than four years after the NCAA began requiring schools to educate their players about the risks of head trauma and develop plans to keep injured athletes off the field.

In a survey that included responses from 907 of the NCAA’s 1,066 members, researchers found that nearly one in five schools either don’t have the required concussion management plan or have done such a poor job in educating their coaches, medical staff and compliance officers that they are not sure one exists.

West Virginia's Terrell Chestnut is examined by medical staff during an NCAA college football game against Baylor earlier this month. He later left the game with a concussion. (Chris Jackson/AP)

West Virginia’s Terrell Chestnut is examined by medical staff during an NCAA college football game against Baylor earlier this month. He later left the game with a concussion. (Chris Jackson/AP)

“Collectively, the institutions without a concussion management plan are responsible for the well-being of thousands of college athletes each year,” according to the study co-written by Harvard researcher Christine Baugh and published this week in the American Journal of Sports Medicine. “For stakeholders to follow an institution’s concussion management plan – or to have confidence that others are following the plan – they must first know that it exists.”

The findings in the study reinforce the images fans have seen in stadiums since the problem with concussions became more widely known: Wobbly players are sent back onto the field without proper medical clearance as coaches remain ignorant to their injury – perhaps willfully. The authors recommend that the NCAA bolster its 2010 policy to require schools to make their plans public, to better educate coaches about concussion symptoms and to require that schools not only come up with plans but actually apply them.

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Surgeon General Nominee Murthy Loses Support Of Key Backers

Dr. Vivek Murthy (Charles Dharapak/AP/File)

Dr. Vivek Murthy (Charles Dharapak/AP/File)

One of the country’s leading medical journals is withdrawing support for a Brigham and Women’s Hospital physician nominated by President Obama to become the next surgeon general.

The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) endorsed Vivek Murthy in May, but an editorial published Wednesday withdraws that support.

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Outbreak On Trial: Who’s To Blame For Bringing Disease Into A Country?

Francina Devariste, 3 years old, is one victim of an ongoing cholera outbreak in Haiti that has killed 8,000 people and sickened over 700,000. (2010 photo courtesy of the United Nations)

Francina Devariste, 3 years old, is one victim of an ongoing cholera outbreak in Haiti that has killed 8,000 people and sickened over 700,000. (2010 photo courtesy of the United Nations)

By Richard Knox

If an international agency introduces a devastating disease to a country, should it be held accountable?

That’s the big question at the heart of a court proceeding that gets underway next Thursday. The international agency is the United Nations. The disease is cholera. And the nation is Haiti.

Four years ago this month, thousands of Haitians downstream from a U.N. peacekeeping encampment began falling ill and dying from cholera, a disease not previously seen in Haiti for at least a century.

Since then cholera has sickened one in every 14 Haitians — more than 700,000 people; and over 8,000 have died. That’s nearly twice the official death count from Ebola in West Africa thus far.

A year ago, a Boston-based human rights group sued the U.N. for bringing cholera to Haiti through infected peacekeeping troops from Nepal, where the disease was circulating at the time. The U.N. camp spilled its sewage directly into a tributary of Haiti’s largest river.

There’s little doubt that the U.N. peacekeepers brought the cholera germ to Haiti. Nor is there argument over the poor sanitary conditions at the U.N. camp.

When I visited the scene in 2012, it was plain how untreated sewage from the camp could easily contaminate the Meille River that runs alongside before it spills into the Artibonite — Haiti’s Mississippi — which provides water for drinking, washing and irrigation for a substantial fraction of the country’s population.

The smoking gun, scientifically, is a molecular analysis of the Haitian cholera bug compared to the Nepalese strain from the same time period. It showed the two differ in only one out of 4 million genetic elements.

“That’s considered an exact match, that they’re the same strain of cholera,” Tufts University environmental engineer Daniele Lantagne told me last year. Continue reading

Mass. Lawmakers Hear Calls For Ebola Training

As nurses raised alarms that they are untrained and ill equipped to handle cases of Ebola virus, Massachusetts hospital officials said Thursday that the health crisis emerging from West Africa demands a unique response.

A licensed clinician participates in a CDC training course in Alabama earlier this month for treating Ebola patients. (Brynn Anderson/AP)

A licensed clinician participates in a CDC training course in Alabama earlier this month for treating Ebola patients. (Brynn Anderson/AP)

At a Public Health Committee hearing, Massachusetts General Hospital Emergency Preparedness Chief Dr. Paul Biddinger said handling cases of Ebola is “fundamentally different” than regular medical care, and suggested hospitals should create a “highly trained expert cadre” to handle Ebola rather than attempting to train all staff equally.

Massachusetts has not had a confirmed case of the deadly disease, though there have been suspect cases and two nurses at a Texas hospital have been infected with the disease. Ebola is spread from the fluids of a person who is infected and symptomatic.

Massachusetts Nurses Association President Donna Kelly Williams said the training and equipment at Massachusetts hospitals is “inconsistent,” and nurses have said they have been provided with “flimsy” garments that Williams said would not adequately protect them against infection.

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‘Ether Dome': The Story Of Numbing And Inflicting Pain

Greg Balla, Lee Sellars (seated), Tom Patterson and Richmond Hoxie act in a scene from "Ether Dome." (Courtesy T. Charles Erickson/Huntington Theatre)

Greg Balla, Lee Sellars (seated), Tom Patterson and Richmond Hoxie act in a scene from “Ether Dome.” (Courtesy T. Charles Erickson/Huntington Theatre)

On Oct. 16, 1846, a flustered young man named William Morton raced up marble steps to the dome of Massachusetts General Hospital.

“He was late, and you don’t want to keep surgeons waiting,” said Dr. John Herman, a psychiatrist at Mass General who is steeped in the history of that day.

A group of physicians awaited Morton in the operating room, located high above other floors because “before ether, people screamed,” Herman said.

Morton, a dentist, had promised to put an end to those screams, to the pain patients endured during surgery.

That day, with a patient waiting, Morton pulled out a glass bottle of ether that he had colored red, according to Herman, to disguise the common gas. Morton told the patient to inhale. Moments later, a surgeon sliced into the neck of a relaxed man.

“As he came out of the anesthesia, the surgeon, John Collins Warren, said ‘Mr. Abbott, did you feel pain?’ and Abbott said, ‘Did you begin the procedure?’ ” Herman recounted. “The world changed. Within days, news of what happened here traveled by steamship and by locomotive … to the capitals of the world.” Continue reading

Harvard Poll On Ebola Risk Finds Public Dazed And Very Confused

A World Health Organization worker trains nurses on how to use Ebola protective gear in Freetown, Sierra Leone. (AP)

A World Health Organization worker trains nurses on how to use Ebola protective gear in Freetown, Sierra Leone. (AP)

By Richard Knox

Americans are seriously confused about how Ebola spreads. And it’s no wonder.

A new national poll from the Harvard School of Public Health finds that nearly 9 out of 10 Americans think someone can catch Ebola if an infected person sneezes or coughs on them.

Not so, according to all health authorities and 38 years of research on this virus. But maybe people can’t be blamed for thinking Ebola can be spread through the air as they see powerful images day after day of health workers clad in head-to-toe protective coverings and face masks.

And there’s little to no possibility that Ebola will mutate into a virus easily spread by aerosol droplets, like influenza or SARS, for reasons that Laurie Garrett of the Council on Foreign Relations recently pointed out in The Washington Post.

Similarly, all the attention on the imported Ebola case of a Liberian man in Dallas and subsequent infection of two of his nurses (so far) is apparently leading many Americans to overestimate their risk of getting the virus.

In contrast, the great majority (80 percent) think they’d survive Ebola if they got immediate care. That’s probably right — though no sure thing.

(Courtesy of Harvard School of Public Health)

(Courtesy of Harvard School of Public Health)

The Harvard poll, conducted between last Wednesday and Sunday, finds that a little over half of Americans worry there will be a large outbreak of Ebola in this country over the coming year.

More than a third worry they or someone in their immediate family will get Ebola. Continue reading

For Hospitals And Clinics: Insurance To Protect Against Losses From Ebola

A Boston-based insurance broker is rolling out a new policy for Ebola-related losses at hospitals and clinics across the country.

A Braintree cop places police tape around a Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates sign on Sunday. A patient there complained of Ebola-like symptoms, briefly closing the center. (Steven Senne/AP)

A Braintree cop places police tape around a Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates sign on Sunday. A patient there complained of Ebola-like symptoms, briefly closing the center. (Steven Senne/AP)

How much money might hospitals lose during an Ebola-related quarantine? And will patients use hospitals that treat the virus? Phil Edmundson at William Gallagher Associates developed Ebola insurance to address these risks.

“People may choose to put off their health care, or to get it at an alternative facility, if they feel there’s a reason to suspect Ebola in a given clinic or hospital,” Edmundson said.

Ebola policies could run half a million dollars or more for large hospitals. They will not cover the cost of closing off wards, training staff or overtime.

Other insurers are offering similar coverage for theaters, restaurants, hotels and other public spaces that may have to close if they have a customer with Ebola.

“All Massachusetts hospitals have general insurance policies and liability policies in place for extreme events,” the Massachusetts Hospital Association said in a statement.

The group said it’s aware that hospitals in the state may be evaluating whether “additional insurance for Ebola-specific events” is necessary.

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