Medicine/Science

The latest cool stuff out of some of the nation's best labs; news on medical research and what it may mean for patients.

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Gottlieb Leaving Partners HealthCare For Partners In Health

Partners CEO Dr. Gary Gottlieb

Partners CEO Dr. Gary Gottlieb

The CEO at Partners HealthCare, the state’s largest private employer, plans to step down.

Dr. Gary Gottlieb agreed Friday to become the CEO at Partners in Health, a global health organization whose latest project is an Ebola response effort in West Africa.

Gottlieb is scheduled to make the transition on July 1, 2015. His decision comes amid acourt review of Partners’ controversial expansion plans and questions about Gottlieb’s ability to manage political dynamics outside the hospital network.

His supporters point out that Gottlieb has just begun his second five-year contract, and they say Partners board members urged Gottlieb to stay. But some current and former Partners leaders say dissatisfaction with Gottlieb’s leadership has been building for months and that the Partners in Health job offers Gottlieb a graceful way out.

He will take a dramatic pay cut, from more than $2 million a year to $200,000 a year at Partners in Health.

Gottlieb serves on the board at Partners in Health, has visited the group’s projects in Haiti and Rwanda, and calls it the most important global health initiative in the world.

“This is a singular opportunity to lead that organization at a time when it is clear that improving sustainable health care throughout the world is critical to all of us,” Gottlieb said.

Gottlieb says he began thinking seriously about moving to Partners in Health this summer, and decided to make the change earlier in the fall after hearing Partners in Health co-founder Paul Farmer describe what was happening in West Africa.

“With Ebola, maternal deaths had increased because there was no place for people to deliver babies,” said Gottlieb. “Malaria deaths had increased because there was no way to provide the appropriate care for what is a more ordinary terrible disease. The notion that building sustainable health care was essential for real social justice and real change had become even more obvious.” Continue reading

Study Raises Questions About Military Service Causing Chronic Suicidal Tendencies

A new study commissioned by the U.S. Army has found that the mental health of soldiers isn’t as different from civilians as the researchers previously thought.

Earlier this year, researchers said that soldiers, who were surveyed at different times during their Army careers, had higher rates of mental disorders before they enlisted than the rates of mental illness in the general population.

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Uber Pilots Program To Bring Flu Shots To Your Door

In this April 3, 2014 photo, a smartphone is mounted on the glass of an Uber car in Mumbai, India. Riding on its startup success and flush with fresh capital, taxi-hailing smartphone app Uber is making a big push into Asia. The company has in the last year started operating in 18 cities in Asia and the South Pacific including Seoul, Shanghai, Bangkok, Hong Kong and five Indian cities. (Rafiq Maqbool/AP)

A smartphone with the Uber app is mounted on the glass of an Uber driver. (Rafiq Maqbool/AP)

If you used Uber in Boston today, you may have noticed a new feature. The car service company was offering what it calls UberHEALTH to bring free flu shots to users’ doors.

The service was part of a one-day pilot program in Boston, New York and Washington D.C., the company announced on its blog.
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Colleges Are Inconsistent In Handling Athlete Concussions, Harvard Study Finds

Colleges remain inconsistent in the way they handle athletes’ concussions, according to a Harvard University study that comes more than four years after the NCAA began requiring schools to educate their players about the risks of head trauma and develop plans to keep injured athletes off the field.

In a survey that included responses from 907 of the NCAA’s 1,066 members, researchers found that nearly one in five schools either don’t have the required concussion management plan or have done such a poor job in educating their coaches, medical staff and compliance officers that they are not sure one exists.

West Virginia's Terrell Chestnut is examined by medical staff during an NCAA college football game against Baylor earlier this month. He later left the game with a concussion. (Chris Jackson/AP)

West Virginia’s Terrell Chestnut is examined by medical staff during an NCAA college football game against Baylor earlier this month. He later left the game with a concussion. (Chris Jackson/AP)

“Collectively, the institutions without a concussion management plan are responsible for the well-being of thousands of college athletes each year,” according to the study co-written by Harvard researcher Christine Baugh and published this week in the American Journal of Sports Medicine. “For stakeholders to follow an institution’s concussion management plan – or to have confidence that others are following the plan – they must first know that it exists.”

The findings in the study reinforce the images fans have seen in stadiums since the problem with concussions became more widely known: Wobbly players are sent back onto the field without proper medical clearance as coaches remain ignorant to their injury – perhaps willfully. The authors recommend that the NCAA bolster its 2010 policy to require schools to make their plans public, to better educate coaches about concussion symptoms and to require that schools not only come up with plans but actually apply them.

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Surgeon General Nominee Murthy Loses Support Of Key Backers

Dr. Vivek Murthy (Charles Dharapak/AP/File)

Dr. Vivek Murthy (Charles Dharapak/AP/File)

One of the country’s leading medical journals is withdrawing support for a Brigham and Women’s Hospital physician nominated by President Obama to become the next surgeon general.

The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) endorsed Vivek Murthy in May, but an editorial published Wednesday withdraws that support.

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‘Ether Dome': The Story Of Numbing And Inflicting Pain

Greg Balla, Lee Sellars (seated), Tom Patterson and Richmond Hoxie act in a scene from "Ether Dome." (Courtesy T. Charles Erickson/Huntington Theatre)

Greg Balla, Lee Sellars (seated), Tom Patterson and Richmond Hoxie act in a scene from “Ether Dome.” (Courtesy T. Charles Erickson/Huntington Theatre)

On Oct. 16, 1846, a flustered young man named William Morton raced up marble steps to the dome of Massachusetts General Hospital.

“He was late, and you don’t want to keep surgeons waiting,” said Dr. John Herman, a psychiatrist at Mass General who is steeped in the history of that day.

A group of physicians awaited Morton in the operating room, located high above other floors because “before ether, people screamed,” Herman said.

Morton, a dentist, had promised to put an end to those screams, to the pain patients endured during surgery.

That day, with a patient waiting, Morton pulled out a glass bottle of ether that he had colored red, according to Herman, to disguise the common gas. Morton told the patient to inhale. Moments later, a surgeon sliced into the neck of a relaxed man.

“As he came out of the anesthesia, the surgeon, John Collins Warren, said ‘Mr. Abbott, did you feel pain?’ and Abbott said, ‘Did you begin the procedure?’ ” Herman recounted. “The world changed. Within days, news of what happened here traveled by steamship and by locomotive … to the capitals of the world.” Continue reading

Harvard Poll On Ebola Risk Finds Public Dazed And Very Confused

A World Health Organization worker trains nurses on how to use Ebola protective gear in Freetown, Sierra Leone. (AP)

A World Health Organization worker trains nurses on how to use Ebola protective gear in Freetown, Sierra Leone. (AP)

By Richard Knox

Americans are seriously confused about how Ebola spreads. And it’s no wonder.

A new national poll from the Harvard School of Public Health finds that nearly 9 out of 10 Americans think someone can catch Ebola if an infected person sneezes or coughs on them.

Not so, according to all health authorities and 38 years of research on this virus. But maybe people can’t be blamed for thinking Ebola can be spread through the air as they see powerful images day after day of health workers clad in head-to-toe protective coverings and face masks.

And there’s little to no possibility that Ebola will mutate into a virus easily spread by aerosol droplets, like influenza or SARS, for reasons that Laurie Garrett of the Council on Foreign Relations recently pointed out in The Washington Post.

Similarly, all the attention on the imported Ebola case of a Liberian man in Dallas and subsequent infection of two of his nurses (so far) is apparently leading many Americans to overestimate their risk of getting the virus.

In contrast, the great majority (80 percent) think they’d survive Ebola if they got immediate care. That’s probably right — though no sure thing.

(Courtesy of Harvard School of Public Health)

(Courtesy of Harvard School of Public Health)

The Harvard poll, conducted between last Wednesday and Sunday, finds that a little over half of Americans worry there will be a large outbreak of Ebola in this country over the coming year.

More than a third worry they or someone in their immediate family will get Ebola. Continue reading

8 Things You Need To Know About Ebola

Cpl. Zachary Wicker shows the use of a germ-protective gear in Fort Bliss, Texas, Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014. About 500 Fort Bliss soldiers are preparing for deployment to West Africa where they will provide support in a military effort to contain the Ebola outbreak. /Juan Carlos Llorca/AP)

Cpl. Zachary Wicker demonstrated the use of a germ-protective gear in Fort Bliss, Texas on Tuesday. (Juan Carlos Llorca/AP)

Ebola has been dominating the headlines lately, raising concern about the disease potentially spreading to Massachusetts. And after two recent Ebola scares in Boston, local authorities are also trying to reassure the public.

Here’s what you need to know about Ebola:

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Boston Patient Not At High Risk For Ebola, Health Officials Say

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston (Steven Senne/AP)

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston (Steven Senne/AP)

A man who travels frequently to Liberia caused a stir Sunday afternoon when he arrived at a Braintree clinic with Ebola-like symptoms. But doctors and public health officials say that the man is not considered at high risk for the often deadly virus. His case did, however, give us the first public look at how nurses, EMTs, hospital staff and others have prepared to respond when there is an Ebola alert.

WBUR’s Martha Bebinger spoke with WBUR’s Bob Oakes on Monday with more on the story.

Bob Oakes: How did this man, who has not been identified, become the focus of police escorts, press conferences and numerous statements on Sunday?

Martha Bebinger: The man called his primary care practice, Harvard Vanguard, in Braintree Sunday morning, complaining of a headache, muscle aches and some other problems. He was given an appointment in the afternoon. The man went to the Harvard Vanguard pharmacy to pick up a prescription for something else, then left.

But after that first call, Harvard Vanguard reviewed his medical record and noticed that the man traveled frequently to Liberia. The office staff then called the patient and “intercepted” him as he was coming in. They asked him to wait in his car while they called for an ambulance. The Harvard Vanguard office was closed for a period of time, while they disinfected surfaces in the pharmacy they believe he touched, and then reopened.

The man waited, cooperatively, we’re told, in his car, sort of a self-quarantine, until an ambulance arrived. What kind of precautions were in place there?

Brewster ambulance completed their Ebola response training about a week ago. Brewster’s director of training, Jeff Jacobson, says the company was on the scene in 15 minutes with two ambulances, one that had been sealed inside with plastic and three EMTs wearing hazardous materials suits.

“Once the patient is removed from the ambulance and into the hospital, two more folks get into the level B suits and remove all the plastic, put in sealed containers, then the vehicle is disinfected, following the Centers for Disease Control recommendations,” Jacobson said.

In all, Jacobson estimates there were 40 responders, including police, firefighters, local public health and Harvard Vanguard personnel.

Forty personnel arrived? And were all of those responders trained in Ebola safety practices?

I heard both yes and no. Only people who may come in contact with the patient or his body fluids need to wear gloves and protective gear. But I also heard there was a call Sunday, after this incident, on which some participants felt the response was too much while others thought that a maximum effort is warranted as responders test and adjust their reaction to Ebola.

The ambulance took the patient to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where I imagine there were a few nervous staff members. Earlier Sunday, the CDC confirmed that a nurse who treated a man who died from Ebola in Dallas has come down with the virus. Continue reading