Personal Health

News you can use, carefully digested and curated.


As If PMS Weren’t Bad Enough, Study Links It To Later High Blood Pressure

(Newton Free Library/Flickr Creative Commons)

(Newton Free Library/Flickr Creative Commons)

By Dr. David Scales

As if the symptoms of PMS itself weren’t bad enough – the hot flashes, dizziness, cramping, trouble sleeping — now researchers have found a possible link to high blood pressure.
Currently, doctors are naturally aware of Premenstrual Syndrome, but are not thinking about it as a warning sign that a patient is at risk for developing health problems down the line. A new study by Dr. Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson, an epidemiologist at UMass, and her colleagues may soon change that.

They studied over 1,200 women – all part of a well-known and long-followed group called the Nurses’ Health Study – who developed at least moderate PMS. The researchers matched them to twice the number of women without PMS symptoms and looked for links to the diagnosis of high blood pressure.
Their analysis, published this week in the Journal of Epidemiology, found women with moderate-to-severe PMS had a 40% higher risk of developing high blood pressure over the next 20 years than the control group that experienced few PMS symptoms.
The researchers took into account factors we already know lead to hypertension, such as obesity, smoking, or a lack of exercise.
Still, the study had a number of limitations, so it will need to be repeated to make sure the link between PMS and high blood pressure holds up to scrutiny.
Dr. Bertone-Johnson and her colleagues are also looking into ways to prevent the symptoms of PMS. So far, they have found that high dietary intake of certain vitamins like thiamine, riboflavin or vitamin D as well as calcium can lower the risk of developing PMS. Another study by Bertone-Johnson’s group suggested increased iron and zinc intake may be protective.
These studies are preliminary, though, so I wouldn’t go out and load up on vitamins, iron and zinc –- but they do suggest that PMS may be treatable, and that treatment might help prevent some of its potentially harmful downstream consequences.

Elder Hunger: New Efforts To Combat Surprisingly Common Malnutrition Among Seniors

Jeff Kubina/Flickr

Jeff Kubina/Flickr

By Nell Lake

After her stroke, a 95-year-old woman in New York State found that she could no longer taste her food. She was also unable to feel hunger, so she didn’t know when she was supposed to eat. As a result, the woman began losing weight, grew weak and wasn’t getting the nutrients she needed.

Enter Meals on Wheels, a national home-delivered meals program established by the 1965 Older Americans Act. The woman (who asked that her name not be used) began receiving meals at her home five days a week. This, she says, helped her remember to eat regularly. Her weight improved, and so did her general health.

Malnutrition like hers is surprisingly common. Six percent of the elderly who live at home in the United States and in other developed countries are malnourished, according to a 2010 study in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society. The rate of elder malnutrition doubles among those in nursing homes — 14% according to the same study.

And rates skyrocket among elderly populations in rehabilitation facilities and hospitals: Various measures show an astonishing one third to one half of seniors are malnourished upon being admitted to the hospital.

“Malnutrition is a serious and under-recognized problem among older adults,” says Nancy Wellman, a nutritionist and instructor at Tuft University’s Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

It’s not a new problem. But growth in the elderly population, and concerns about healthcare costs, have helped renew efforts by nutritionists and other advocates to establish screenings for malnutrition in medical settings, and to improve interventions that can prevent or reverse the issue.

Nutrition Complexities

Most basically, malnutrition means not getting enough nutrients for optimal health. In older adults, the causes are complex, experts say. Illness, disability, social isolation, poverty — often a combination of these — can all contribute to malnutrition. An older person may become malnourished because she has trouble chewing or swallowing. The medications she takes may suppress appetite. She may be unable to get to a grocery store. She may live alone, be depressed, or simply be uninterested in eating.

It’s important to know, says Connie Bales, a dietician and faculty member at Duke University Medical Center, that obese and overweight seniors can be malnourished, too. Eating too many calories doesn’t necessarily mean you’re getting the right nutrients for maintaining muscle and bone. “One can be quite malnourished, yet not be skinny,” Bales says.

High Costs 

Whatever the cause, malnutrition leads to further trouble. It increases older adults’ risk of illness, frailty and infection. Malnourished people visit the doctor and are admitted to the hospital more often, have longer hospital stays and recover from surgery more slowly.

The association between malnutrition and hospitalization goes both ways, say Wellman and other experts: The sick are more likely to become malnourished, and the malnourished are more likely to get sick. Continue reading

Why To Exercise (During Pregnancy) Today: Ob-Gyns Say It's Best Time To Boost Health

il-young ko/Flickr

il-young ko/Flickr

Yes, they’ve told us this before: If you’re pregnant, you needn’t refrain from exercise. But now, the influential (and fairly conservative) professional group of U.S. obstetricians and gynecologists is saying it even more forcefully: If you’re pregnant and facing no complications, you really should exercise — it’s the ideal time to improve your health, including your weight.

In an updated committee opinion, the group, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)says: “Women with uncomplicated pregnancies should be encouraged to engage in physical activities before, during, and after pregnancy.”

The list of recommended activities includes: walking, swimming, stationary cycling, low-impact aerobics, yoga (modified and not hot), pilates (also modified), running, jogging, racket sports and strength training, and all with the usual caveats to check with your doctor first.

Importantly, the opinion says: “Some patients, obstetrician–gynecologists, and other obstetric care providers are concerned that regular physical activity during pregnancy may cause miscarriage, poor fetal growth, musculoskeletal injury, or premature delivery. For uncomplicated pregnancies, these concerns have not been substantiated…” Continue reading

More On ‘Sundowning,’ And The Agitation That Can Grip Seniors After Dark

(edward musiak/Flickr)

(edward musiak/Flickr)

Our post last week on “sundowning” — a syndrome in which seniors’ behavior changes dramatically after dark — generated an outpouring of stories from patients, caregivers and people working in hospitals, in hundreds of comments on Facebook.

Many brought up the fact that delirium and sundowning are related. While sundowning is thought to happen in elderly patients with advanced dementia, many people described seeing sundowning in others — like a relative after surgery. While experts aren’t sure how much sundown syndrome and delirium overlap, they agree that not everyone who gets confused at night is sundowning.

Delirium is very common and also gets worse at night. So the first time someone experiences delirium they should be checked for underlying and reversible causes like infections or mind-altering medications.

People also pointed out that sundowning can happen at home as well as in the hospital. For people with severe dementia like Alzheimer’s, this is especially true.

Some commenters referenced “The Visit,” a recently released horror movie where two children are visiting their elderly grandparents who exhibit erratic and violent behavior each night. I haven’t seen it myself, but it seems to be taking the concept to the extreme in the most frightening way possible.

Many of the stories on Facebook were particularly moving. We thought we’d share a few: Continue reading


Paleo And Vegan Can Be Friends: 11 Points Of Consensus On What We Should Eat

(J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

(J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

By Rebecca Sananes

For healthy eating fans, it was the All-Star Game. Pick your preferred diet — vegan, paleo, Mediterranean, you name it — and the scientist, clinician or academic behind it was at the table in Boston this week. Think Dean Ornish, S. Boyd Eaton and T. Colin Campbell.

They all gathered at the Finding Common Ground Conference, convened by the nonprofit Oldways, to hammer out a consensus on healthy eating — an antidote to what can seem like endless flip-flops on dietary research. And amazingly enough, they did.

What they found was that despite all the food fights, the prevailing theories of nutrition and healthy eating actually have more in common than you’d think. (Though it’s a bit more complex than Michael Pollan’s classic, “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”)

After two days of presentations on the latest research, debates over ethics and attempts to differentiate between nit-picky nuance and important distinctions, Harvard’s Walter Willett sums up the consensus like this in a press release: “The foods that define a healthy diet include abundant fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, legumes and minimal amounts of refined starch, sugar and red meat, especially keeping processed red meat intake low.”

So there you have it. But for a more granular look, here’s my take on the 11 principles these top scientists and nutritionists agreed should be the guiding principles when thinking about what and how we eat:

1. Yes to the federal guidelines

From the consensus statement:

The Scientists of Oldways Common Ground lend strong, collective support to the food-based recommendations of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, and to the DGAC’s endorsement of healthy food patterns such as the Mediterranean Diet, Vegetarian Diet and Healthy American Diet.

The overall body of evidence examined by the 2015 DGAC identifies that a healthy dietary pattern is higher in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low- or non-fat dairy, seafood, legumes, and nuts; moderate in alcohol (among adults); lower in red and processed meats; and low in sugar-sweetened foods and drinks and refined grains.

Additional strong evidence shows that it is not necessary to eliminate food groups or conform to a single dietary pattern to achieve healthy dietary patterns. Rather, individuals can combine foods in a variety of flexible ways to achieve healthy dietary patterns, and these strategies should be tailored to meet the individual’s health needs, dietary preferences and cultural traditions. Current research also strongly demonstrates that regular physical activity promotes health and reduces chronic disease risk.

The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee is a group of scientists handpicked by the government to create a report detailing nutritional and dietary guidelines. Every five years, their report is reviewed by the USDA and the Department of Human Health Services before being voted on by Congress and implemented as the American Dietary guideline — the public policy informing public school lunches, military food and food industry regulations. The official vetted guidelines are due out by the end of the year.

Along with endorsing that committee’s report, the Oldways Common Ground Committee also backed Mediterranean and vegetarian diets.

2. We have to think about the planet when we eat

Form the consensus:

We emphatically support the inclusion of sustainability in the 2015 DGAC report, and affirm the appropriateness and importance of this imperative in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans because food insecurity cannot be solved without sustainable food systems. Inattention to sustainability is willful disregard for the quality and quantity of food available to the next generation, i.e., our own children.

Background: The DGAC recommended to Congress, for the first time, that nutritional policy should take into account environmental impact. Continue reading

For Depression, Computer-Assisted Therapy Offers Little Benefit, Study Finds

It’s unlikely that your therapist will be replaced by a computer program anytime soon.

That’s the takeaway of recent study out of Britain looking at the effectiveness of computer-assisted therapy for depression.

The bottom line: The computer programs offered little or no benefit compared to more typical primary care for adults with depression. That’s largely because the patients were generally “unwilling to engage” with the programs, and adherence faltered, researchers conclude, adding that the study “highlighted the difficulty in repeatedly logging on to computer systems when [patients] are clinically depressed.”

In an accompanying editorial, Christopher Dowrick, a professor of primary care medicine at the University of Liverpool, stated what may seem obvious: Many depressed patients, he wrote, don’t want to interact with computers; rather, “they prefer to interact with human beings.” He noted that the poor result “suggests that guided self help is not the panacea that busy [primary care doctors] and cost conscious clinical commissioning groups would wish for.”

(Lloyd Morgan/Flickr)

(Lloyd Morgan/Flickr)

As part of the study, published in the BMJ, 691 patients suffering from depression were randomly assigned to receive the usual primary care, including access to mental health care, or the usual care plus one of two computer-assisted options that offer cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), a form of therapy that encourages patients to reframe negative thoughts. Patients were assessed at four, 12 and 24 months; those using the computer programs (one called “Beating the Blues” and the other “MoodGYM“) were also contacted weekly by phone and offered encouragement and technical support.

The context of all this is that demand for mental health services generally exceeds supply around the globe, and health systems are seeking ways to bridge the gap. According to the new paper, demand for cognitive behavioral therapy, for instance, “cannot be met by existing therapist resources.” So, the thinking goes, maybe a computer can ease some of the caseload. And in some cases, it works. Indeed, Britain’s National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend computerized CBT as an “initial lower intensity treatment for depression….” based on studies that showed it can be effective.

However, results of this latest study may nudge clinicians and policymakers to rethink the computer’s role in therapy.

Here are the results, summed up in BMJ news release:

Results showed that cCBT offered little or no benefit over usual GP care. By four months, 44% of patients in the usual care group, 50% of patients in the Beating the Blues group, and 49% in the MoodGYM group remained depressed…. Continue reading

CDC Report Tracks The IUD Renaissance

You might call it the “Comeback Contraception.” In any case, it seems, IUD use is on the upswing.

This week’s CDC National Health Statistic Report highlights the surge: The number of women using long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) has almost doubled in recent years, and most of the increase is due to the growing popularity of IUDs.

From the report:

Among women currently using contraception, use of LARC increased from 6.0% for 2006–2010 to 11.6% for 2011–2013. Use of IUDs makes up the bulk of this category, with 10.3% of current contraceptors using an IUD during 2011–2013.

The number of women using long-acting reversible contraception has increased from 6 percent in 2006 to 11.6 percent in recent years. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

The number of women using long-acting reversible contraception has increased from 6 percent in 2006 to 11.6 percent in recent years. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Intrauterine devices remain less popular than other forms of contraception, according to the report. The pill ranks as the most widely used method (it’s taken by 25.9 percent of women who use contraception, or 9.7 million women), followed by female sterilization (25.1 percent, or 9.4 million women) and the male condom (used by just over 15 percent, or 5.8 million women).

Still, LARC devices, including IUDs and contraceptive implants, were used by 11.6 percent or 4.4 million women, according to the report: “While the most commonly used methods — female sterilization, the pill, and the male condom — appear to remain consistent over time, an increase has been noted in the use of LARC methods, primarily the IUD.”

A confluence of events have contributed to the IUD’s renaissance, experts say, including an improved product, a drop in price and more promotion by doctors, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, and backing by the family of Warren Buffett.



Darker Days: Talk Therapy May Be More Durable Than Light Treatment For Seasonal Affective Disorder

For me, it’s already started: As the darkness descends around 5 p.m., my mood starts to sink too. And it’s not even Thanksgiving.

Victims of SAD, or seasonal affective disorder, a form of depression marked by a dip in mood during the darker winter months, take note: Light therapy may help, but talk therapy may be more “durable” in the long-term.

Researchers at the University of Vermont report that light therapy (essentially, simulating sunrise by sitting in front of a device upon waking that emits high intensity artificial light, around 10,000 lux, for at least 30 minutes) was comparably effective as cognitive behavioral therapy for addressing acute episodes of SAD.

(Lloyd Morgan/Flickr)

(Lloyd Morgan/Flickr)

However, the researchers found that after two subsequent winters nearly half the subjects in the light therapy group reported a recurrence of depression, compared with just over one-fourth of those in the cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group.

Lead researcher Kelly Rohan, Ph.D. a professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences at the University of Vermont in Burlington, said in an interview that after two winters: “The CBT [patients] maintained their gains better, and we found a more enduring effect of the CBT treatment two years out. Fewer had recurrences of depression and, as a whole, their depressive symptoms were fewer and less intense than people with light therapy.”

Over 14 million Americans suffer from SAD, the researchers report, based on extrapolating a national number from a smaller U.S. sample; prevalence ranges from 1.5 percent of the population in southern states like Florida to over 9 percent in the northern regions of the country.

“There’s no argument that light therapy is a very effective treatment that can substantially improve winter depressive symptomsunder acute conditions, Rohan said in the interview. “But there’s an assumption that people stick to it, and interventions that require effort from people face compliance issues over time.”

The study’s bottom line, she said, is:

“I think the data show that consumers have choices — light therapy is very effective — the question is, ‘Am I willing to stick with it long term and then continue on through the whole winter and pick it up next fall through the winter?’…if so, more power to you. However, if you are willing to consider an alternative, that is CBT, it might be more durable  — you can carry it into the future like a toolbox, you’ve got coping techniques you can use over time.” 

(Full disclosure: Dr. Rohan receives book royalties from Oxford University Press for the treatment manual for the cognitive-behavioral therapy for SAD intervention.)

So how does CBT for SAD differ from therapy for general depression? Rohan says the approach is similar — with a bit of custom tailoring. For instance, the therapist might say something like: “‘We know the dark days are a big contributor to the onset of your symptoms and we can’t control that — we can’t control the sunrise and sunset. But we can control your reaction, and what you think and what you do in response to these light and temperature changes.’ ”

In general, CBT for this condition hinges on reframing the patient’s thinking about the approaching winter — away from a negative attitude about the shorter, darker, freezing, snowbound days, and toward a more positive approach, for instance: What kind of fun, frolicking things can I get out and do in the cold?

“Instead of hibernating and becoming more socially withdrawn,” Rohan said, “we try to get people more engaged in fun winter activities.”

And if you think escaping to the Caribbean will solve your problem, think again: “We don’t endorse jumping on a plane — that’s avoidance, that’s pretending it’s summer when it’s actually winter,” she said. “And dialing the heat up in your home or going to a tanning bed, we don’t advocate for that either — that’s denial, that’s never an adaptive coping strategy. We want people to take winter by the horns.”

Personally, sunshine-filled vacation therapy in winter has worked for me, but Rohan pushed me to rethink this strategy. “When you come back from a trip like that, re-entry can be really jarring,” she said. “Patients feel great when they’re there, when they come back to reality it can really bite.”

Here are some more specifics on the study, published online in the American Journal of Psychiatry, from the UVM news release:

In the study, 177 research subjects were treated with six weeks of either light therapy – timed, daily exposure to bright artificial light of specific wavelengths using a light box – or a special form of CBT that taught them to challenge negative thoughts about dark winter months and resist behaviors, like social isolation, that effect mood. Continue reading

Fatal Fat Shaming? How Weight Discrimination May Lead To Premature Death

Jeff Newell, left, in November 2014, and then on Oct. 18 of this year, after finishing his first road race (Courtesy)

Jeff Newell, left, in November 2014, and then on Oct. 18 of this year, after finishing his first road race (Courtesy)

As soon as the chair broke under the weight of his 533 pounds, Jeff Newell knew he wouldn’t get the job.

With a background in customer service and a culinary arts degree, Newell, of Taunton, Massachusetts, had been searching fruitlessly for work for several years. Finally, a great job near his home opened up that seemed a perfect fit with his credentials. But then came the chair-breaking incident. Humiliating, yes, but even more infuriating because the interviewer, offering neither help nor an apology, simply shook her head and made a face.

“I knew what she was thinking: ‘This person is overweight and he’s going to be lazy and why should I hire him?’ ” Newell said. The situation was mortifying emotionally, but also took a physical toll. Newell broke out in a sweat, his heart racing.

The sort of weight-based discrimination that he says he experienced is not just unpleasant and stressful; it may actually lead to premature death, a recent study finds.

While earlier research has shown that weight discrimination is associated with poor health outcomes for a variety of reasons, the new study, led by researchers at Florida State University, concludes that in addition, “weight discrimination may shorten life expectancy.”

The new analysis found an association only, and no causal link between discrimination and life expectancy. Still, researchers in the field say the paper, published in the journal Psychological Science, adds to a growing body of literature pointing to the deep, long-term impact of weight bias and discrimination.

“I think this is one of the most important papers to come out in the research of weight stigma,” said A. Janet Tomiyama, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Psychology Department at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she studies weight stigma and directs UCLA’s Dieting, Stress, and Health Laboratory. “The finding itself is astonishing, but even more significant is that they were able to replicate the finding across two very high quality cohort studies. The crucial implication here is that the stigma alone of being heavy can be harmful to health — and we know that weight stigma is rampant in this country.”

The findings emerged after researchers analyzed data from two separate national studies: the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), with more than 13,000 participants, and the Midlife in the United States Study (MIDUS), with more than 5,000 participants. The two studies (conducted about 10 years apart) both included reports on perceived discrimination, including weight discrimination.

The new analysis found that weight discrimination was associated with an increase in mortality risk of nearly 60 percent among both HRS and MIDUS participants and also that the increased risk “was not accounted for by common physical and psychological risk factors.” In other words, the health effects of the discrimination were teased out from the health effects of the weight itself.

In an interview, Angelina Sutin, the study’s lead researcher and an assistant professor in the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine at Florida State University College of Medicine in Tallahassee, said the big surprise was that even after statistically controlling for other factors such as body-mass index, level of disease, depression and smoking, among others, the experience of weight discrimination was linked with people dying earlier than expected.

“What was really surprising was that the association was there not just in one sample but in two, and the associations were almost identical,” Sutin said.

Weight discrimination and bias are widespread, according to an overview on the stigma of obesity, and that translates into inequities in employment, health care and education

And that stigma appears to contribute to a “vicious cycle,” according to Tomiyama, of UCLA, who writes about “a positive feedback loop wherein weight stigma begets weight gain.”

Indeed, in an earlier study, Tomiyama found that children labeled as “too fat” had an increased risk of having an obese body mass index nearly a decade later.

So why might stigma be causing such problems, and possibly contributing to premature death?

That question wasn’t addressed in the recent study, but Sutin offered some informed speculation.

“Part of it might be stress that people are carrying around with them,” she said. But sometimes it’s where the discrimination comes from that’s meaningful. For instance, she said: “Families are often the source of weight discrimination,” and that can be particularly painful, since “families are supposed to be a support.”

Also, several studies find that weight bias is rampant among medical students and other health care providers. Even eating disorder specialists are not immune to negative stereotypes about obese patients, according to a 2014 study. This attitude among health care professionals can lead to delays in care and treatment, and also misdiagnoses, experts say.

Much of the research on weight stigma and discrimination is led by Rebecca Puhl, Ph.D., deputy director of the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity and a professor in the Department of Human Development & Family Studies at the University of Connecticut. She said there are several possible mechanisms at work that could contribute to premature mortality for people subject to weight discrimination.

“Other studies have found that when people are exposed to weight stigma or discrimination, that they actually experience elevated physiological stress responses (e.g., cortisol reactivity, blood pressure) which could contribute to poor health outcomes,” Puhl wrote in an email. “In addition, studies show that exposure to weight stigma can also lead to increased calorie intake, food consumption, and binge eating, which could play roles as well. The idea here is that weight stigma can induce emotional distress, which in turn becomes a trigger for turning to some of these maladaptive eating patterns as temporary coping strategies to alleviate those negative feelings.”

Sarah Bramblette, who has a master’s degree in health law, says even though she suffers from a medical condition called Lipedema that contributed to her current weight of over 400 pounds, she has been subjected to weight discrimination throughout her life. While she says some of the nasty comments hurt her feelings, it’s the bias from health professionals that has the greatest impact.

Here’s how Bramblette opened her recent TedxNSU talk at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale:

When I first appeared on stage, what was your perception of me? Lazy, disgusting, perhaps depressed, unmotivated, unhealthy? Based on my appearance it’s usually assumed… that my weight and my condition in life are self-induced. That’s not true, but often I don’t get a second chance to make a first impression….Weight bias that I’ve experienced in health care has hurt me physically. When doctors and nurses have the perception that I’m lazy and unmotivated and noncompliant, that influences the care they provide and it has a negative impact on my health.

Continue reading

Father Who Suffered Unthinkable Loss Produces Documentary About Suicide

Steve Mongeau, left, the executive director of Samaritans, Inc., and Ken Lambert at WBUR (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Steve Mongeau, left, the executive director of Samaritans, Inc., and Ken Lambert at WBUR (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Nearly eight years ago, the news was filled with reports of a tragedy on Route 495 in Lowell. A woman carried two small children into the middle of the interstate. All three were killed.

The woman was 39-year-old Marci Thibault. The children were her niece and nephew. She was supposed to take them to her home in Bellingham for a sleepover. Investigators determined Thibault deliberately walked the children into the traffic.

“It was clearly a severe mental illness that made what happened happen, and it was not Marci in her own mind,” said Ken Lambert, the father of the two children.

Marci Thibault with her niece Kaleigh and nephew Shane. (Courtesy of the family)

Marci Thibault with her niece Kaleigh and nephew Shane. (Courtesy of the family)

Kaleigh was 5 and Shane was 4 when they died that night. Marci, who led them into the road, was their mother Danielle’s twin sister.

The tragedy left Ken and Danielle Lambert of Brentwood, New Hampshire, confronting the issues of mental illness and suicide. Even through his grief, Ken Lambert doesn’t villianize his sister-in-law for the death of his children. He says she was much more than her mental illness.

“People are quick to blame, but people forget she was a mother, she was a daughter, she was a sister, she was a friend,” he said. “You know, she had a family. She had a life. She ended up having, of course, a psychotic break. And we would have never thought that was even remotely possible.”

Lambert and his wife wanted to do something productive in memory of their loved ones. They started an organization called Keep Sound Minds. Its goal is to raise awareness of mental illness and suicide.

And as part of the group’s work, Lambert has produced a documentary film about an organization that many of us know from those signs near large bridges: Samaritans, Inc., the Boston-based group that has been around for 40 years. The documentary is called “Samaritans: You Are Not Alone.” At the heart of the organization is still a hotline you can call or now text (1-877-870-4673).

Continue reading