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Even In Mass., Hundreds Of Young Central American Refugees Seek Care

"Flor" (Richard Knox for WBUR)

“Flor” (Richard Knox for WBUR)

By Richard Knox

CHELSEA, Mass. — The young Honduran woman appeared at the Chelsea HealthCare Center last February, fearing she was pregnant.

“Flor” — a pseudonym to protect family members back in Honduras — had paid a “coyote” $8,000 to escort her and her 3-year-old daughter to the U.S.-Mexican border. But when they got to the border town of Nuevo Laredo, the coyote sold her to a gang that held her in a tiny room with seven other women.

They raped her, then told her to pay $17,000 or they’d sell her daughter’s organs and force her into sex slavery.

Up in Massachusetts, her mother and father scrambled to borrow the money and wire it to Nuevo Laredo. Her kidnappers released Flor and the little girl; she doesn’t know what happened to the other women.

Flor and her daughter are among hundreds of Central American immigrants who’ve made their way to the blue-collar town of Chelsea, Mass., over the past year.

They represent a quiet influx that began months before the phenomenon hit the headlines and protests began flaring in communities from Cape Cod to California.

They come to Chelsea because many of them have family there. Sixty-two percent of the town’s 35,000 residents are Latino, and many are from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala.

As we sit in a conference room at the Chelsea health center, the sun backlights the thick dark hair that frames Flor’s broad face as she tells me how and why she made the 2,300-mile trek from the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa.

“The decision I made, why I came here, was to give a better future to my daughter,” Flor says in Spanish, silent tears trickling down her cheeks. “In Honduras, it is very difficult. The gangs, they’re killing a lot of people. You have to give money month-to-month or they go to your house and they kill you.” Continue reading

Son, Mom, Psychiatrists Reflect On Finding Your Own Way With ADHD

Peter and Ellen Braaten (courtesy)

Peter and Ellen Braaten (courtesy)

Peter Braaten, now 20, still retains an indelible third-grade memory of being unable — simply unable — to stay seated in a reading circle. “And I just started walking around, because that’s what made me feel okay at the time. And the teacher said, ‘No, sit down, sit down.’ And I basically just couldn’t sit there, because I felt unsettled at the time. And I just couldn’t read, I wasn’t getting into it, so I kept pacing, kept pacing…”

Ellen Braaten, PhD, Peter’s mother and the chief child neuropsychologist at Massachusetts General Hospital, is an expert on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, but that doesn’t mean it was easy to cope with it in her son. She recalls the “humbling” experience of going to IEP — Individual Education Program — meetings with school staff as a parent rather than an expert: “Peter has seen me in IEP meetings where I’ve had to yell at them…”

They share their experiences in the podcast above with Dr. Gene Beresin, director of the Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Center’s associate director, Dr. Steve Schlozman, who treated Peter. One central message from the podcast, Dr. Beresin says: “As with every psychological problem, we all have to find out what works for us. Because what works for one person is not necessarily what works for all. There are no magic bullets. No platitudes. No simplistic answers.” But Peter is now earning all A’s in community college, helped in part by academic coaching and regular exercise. The post below supplements the podcast above.

By Peter Braaten, Ellen Braaten and Gene Beresin
Guest contributors

Peter:

One of the most difficult things for me about being diagnosed with ADHD (especially at such an early age) was understanding this as a helpful push in the right direction. It was very hard for me to appreciate what a “diagnosis” means. Does it just mean a guide for treatment? Well, that might be fine for a doctor, but in my experience it is not good guide for others. In some ways, it significantly influences the ways others view you. Some understand what it means, while others don’t — some adults around me did not even believe it exists or just seemed to disregard it.

‘I have gotten in trouble more times than days I’ve lived on this planet.’

Context is what I find difficult with this diagnosis. It is really something that affects every aspect of your life, which is why it is so hard for other people (teachers, parents, etc.) to understand what it means for an individual to have ADHD. A diagnosis in itself does not inform others around you what tasks are easy or difficult. It does not differentiate effort levels. So for me, some activities have been pretty easy to accomplish, while others are very hard, if not impossible, without some kind of coaching. And the amount of energy that it takes me to do different projects is highly variable. But only I know this, and a teacher, parent, friend might not know what I am going through — they are not living my life.

We live in a world where results are everything. Too often I have been told to just ‘try harder.’ Well, ‘trying hard’ just doesn’t cut it anymore – it is not so simple if you have ADHD, and especially if you have problems with organization in some tasks. I have gotten in trouble more times than days I’ve lived on this planet because I complete 85% of an assignment, task, or any kind of job. And then when I just cannot do the rest, others around get angry, frustrated, or don’t understand. And worse, I get really down on myself! Continue reading

Virtual Check-Ups: The Doctor Will See Your Online Responses Now

(Medisoft via Compfight/Flickr)

(Medisoft via Compfight/Flickr)

Veronica Thomas
CommonHealth Intern

Like many patients with chronic conditions, Lesley Watts used to come in to the doctor’s office for a check-up on her digestive disorder every 12 months. This not only meant time spent in traffic and scouring for a parking spot, but also the brain fog and stress of answering her doctor’s questions on the spot.

But a year ago, when it was time for her visit, she instead  received an email reminder to pull up an online form that asked her everything her doctor needed to know about her symptoms. From the comfort of her recliner, Watts carefully answered the questions, among them: “Overall, how have your reflux symptoms been since your last office visit?” “How much have your symptoms affected your work, social, and/or home life?”

When she was satisfied with her responses, she clicked “submit.” The next day, she received instructions from her doctor about how to manage her symptoms better. Visit complete. And patient satisfied.

“It asked me questions that I had never been asked before, and as a consequence, I learned about symptoms I had not recognized,” she remembers. “I believe I received better care because I was able to take my time and provide more accurate answers.”

“We believe that it can actually increase your engagement with the system because you’re thinking about your condition outside of the physician’s office.”
– Dr. Ronald Dixon

Virtual care and tele-medicine are hot health topics, replete with weighty promises of revolutionizing healthcare. But they often refer to realtime video-chatting or texting with a clinician—whether it’s your personal provider or a random doctor overseas.

The Massachusetts General Hospital service that Lesley Watts participated in aims to conduct virtual visits without the realtime interaction.

Instead, patients complete an online questionnaire for their specific conditions, and send it to their personal doctor—whom they already know and trust—for review and response. For the past two years, primary care clinicians at an MGH Beacon Hill practice have been using over 30 different forms to follow up with some of their adult patients.

According to Dr. Amy Fogelman, a physician at the Beacon Hill practice, the clinical questionnaires are especially useful for chronic conditions that need management over time, like obesity and hypertension. In fact, the obesity questionnaire has proven more effective at helping patients lose weight than any other method she’s tried, she says. Continue reading

Boston Marathon Medical Director: Getting Back To What The Race Is About

 

Medical personnel work outside the medical tent after the Boston Marathon bombing on April 15, 2013. (Elise Amendola/AP)

Medical personnel work outside the medical tent after the Boston Marathon bombing on April 15, 2013. (Elise Amendola/AP)

Last April 15 at about 2:45, Dr. Aaron Baggish was enjoying the sunny spring day and, in his role as medical director of the Boston Marathon, marveling at the low volume of runners who needed his care. Then the first bomb exploded, about 15 feet away from him. It blew out his right eardrum but the crowd blocked much of the force of the blast, and within seconds he was over the barrier and starting to work on the injured.

After the bombing, Dr. Baggish, who heads the Cardiovascular Performance Program at Massachusetts General Hospital, declined requests for interviews, feeling unable to speak publicly about what happened. But as Boston gears up for its next marathon on April 21 and he prepares to help oversee the race’s medical staff once again, he agreed to share some of his thoughts.

As you reflect back on what happened at last year’s marathon, what are you thinking, what lessons do you see?

Basically, I gave up very early on trying to make sense of any of this. There’s no way to make sense of a senseless, horrible act. We’ll never be able to put it into a neat compartment and say, ‘Oh, yes, that’s why this happened.’ No sense can be made of it. So the next step is, what was the impact on me personally? How do I go about some form of healing process? And how do you reconcile the personal trauma with ‘I have a job I have to do’? And we have a job now that we have to do this year, which is as important if not more important than ever: To run the safest, most medically comprehensive race we possibly can.

Are you medical director again?

Of course. You’d better believe it. Nowhere I’d rather be.

Dr. Aaron Baggish (Courtesy MGH)

Dr. Aaron Baggish at work (MGH)

To ask you your own questions, what was the impact on you personally? How do you go about some form of healing process?

It’s been a series of phases, if you will. There was an immediate, necessary phase of blocking everything out and dealing with the professional aftermath: the meetings and debriefings and making sure the volunteers were okay. That lasted for about a month and was more of a business-as-usual sort of feel than anyone could imagine.

But once the media coverage slowed down and Boylston Street was cleared, that’s when the real, hard personal work started. That’s when the concept of PTSD became a reality.

For example?

For example, I was participating in a Triathlon on Lake Winnepesaukee in August. It’s a race I do every year, a half Iron Man, it’s a special day for me, and I was standing on the beach and watching the professional athletes get going, and they fired a cannon for the men’s start. I knew it was coming. What I didn’t realize was that they would fire a second cannon for the women. So three minutes later, they fired a second cannon and I just disintegrated. I had an unbelievable physiological response. I became nauseous, shaking, and it was then I realized that this was a real, deep scar that would be left for a long time. That was a turning point for me; it made me aware I needed to talk about things more, not publicly but with family and friends and colleagues. That was a good step, and over the fall I very actively engaged with people I trust and feel emotionally safe with, to make certain I could start processing some of this. That took some time, and there were some dark moments there. Continue reading

Must-Read: Dr. Arnold Relman On Lessons From Breaking His Neck

Dr. Arnold Relman on YouTube in 2009.

Dr. Arnold Relman on YouTube in 2009.

Dr. Arnold Relman, former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, has long played a rare role in the health care sphere: He’s an exceedingly senior and authoritative Harvard figure willing to speak out about what’s wrong in American medicine, from financial conflicts to the need for health care reform.

Now, unfortunately, Dr. Relman has new, first-person lessons to share. In a powerful and compelling piece in The New York Review of Books — On Breaking One’s Neck — he describes the stairway fall that nearly killed him at age 90, and offers his assessment of the care he received at Massachusetts General Hospital and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Cambridge during his time as a desperately ill patient.  Among the lessons he shares:

What did this experience teach me about the current state of medical care in the US? Quite a lot, as it turns out. I always knew that the treatment of the critically ill in our best teaching hospitals was excellent. That was certainly confirmed by the life-saving treatment I received in the Massachusetts General emergency room. Physicians there simply refused to let me die (try as hard as I might). But what I hadn’t appreciated was the extent to which, when there is no emergency, new technologies and electronic record-keeping affect how doctors do their work. Attention to the masses of data generated by laboratory and imaging studies has shifted their focus away from the patient. Doctors now spend more time with their computers than at the bedside. That seemed true at both the ICU and Spaulding. Reading the physicians’ notes in the MGH and Spaulding records, I found only a few brief descriptions of how I felt or looked, but there were copious reports of the data from tests and monitoring devices. Conversations with my physicians were infrequent, brief, and hardly ever reported.

What personal care hospitalized patients now get is mostly from nurses. In the MGH ICU the nursing care was superb; at Spaulding it was inconsistent. I had never before understood how much good nursing care contributes to patients’ safety and comfort, especially when they are very sick or disabled. This is a lesson all physicians and hospital administrators should learn. When nursing is not optimal, patient care is never good.

Read Dr. Relman’s full piece here. One personal reaction: I felt a bit defensive for Spaulding; my late mother received excellent care at their Boston facility. But then I thought: If every patient — particularly patients with as much authority as Dr. Relman — routinely reported publicly on where the nursing care was great and where it was inconsistent, that could help lead to constructive change at the places where it’s needed. We often talk about care that falls short in personal chats, but hospitals need that feedback — and perhaps some of it should be public — to help them improve.

Readers, thoughts, reactions?

Brain Cancer: Gene Test May Do Work Of Biopsy, Help Track Tumors

Performing a brain biopsy (Wikimedia Commons)

Performing a brain biopsy (Wikimedia Commons)

If you remember the progression of bad medical news about the late Sen. Ted Kennedy, you know that a diagnosis of brain cancer tends to go like this: Something prompts suspicion — in Kennedy’s case, a seizure. A brain scan adds more information. Then the surgeons drill through the skull for a biopsy, taking a sample of the tumor for an analysis of its make-up that then guides the medical team’s treatment strategy.

New research just out of Massachusetts General Hospital suggests a possible improvement on that routine: Instead of the brain biopsy, the researchers found, it may be possible to analyze a patient’s brain tumor just by taking a sample of cerebrospinal fluid and checking the genetic material in tiny sacs that the tumor sheds into the fluid. And that method could also enable doctors to track a tumor over time — it’s far easier to take repeated spinal fluid samples than to repeatedly drill into the skull — and thus follow how the tumor evolves and fight it as it does.

Xandra Breakefield of Mass. General’s Molecular Neurogenetics Unit explains that these latest brain-tumor findings fit into the relatively new field — from perhaps the last five years or so — of analyzing DNA and RNA in body fluids to track cancer patients’ tumors.

“Each tumor is a bit of an individual in the sense that different kinds of changes in the DNA of the cells turn it into a tumor and define the kind of tumor it is,” she said. “So in this age of personalized medicine and making drugs for cancer that target specific changes that are driving specific tumors, when a person starts having symptoms, the physician wants to know, is this a tumor and if so, what kind of a tumor is it? Is it going to be slow-growing or fast-growing? That’s going to determine how aggressively, or how, to go after it.”

Dr. Breakefield and her team found genetic evidence  in spinal fluid that a tumor was very slow-growing — good news for a patient and very important for the medical team to know. When it’s known that a tumor is less aggressive, surgery may be able to spare more of a patient’s brain, she said. Continue reading

The Man Behind The Mass. General Mummy

Padi, the Masschusetts General Hospital mummy (Photo: Sascha Garrey)

Padi, the Masschusetts General Hospital mummy (Photo: Sascha Garrey)

Over the weekend, Padihershef, the most famous mummy in Boston, was treated to a facelift.

Since 1823, when the city of Boston donated him to the hospital as a medical oddity, Padihershef — nicknamed Padi — has kept a silent vigil in his ornate but fading coffin in the Ether Dome, the amphitheater of Massachusetts General Hospital.

He has been privy to pedagogical surgeries performed in front of generations of medical students. But this weekend, it was Padi’s turn to take the stage.

Mimi Leveque, a seasoned mummy conservator and restorer of ancient artifacts, performed what she called a “mummy spa-treatment,” in which she removed salt deposits from Padi’s face using swabs dipped in saliva, while a team of medical experts examined MRI scans of the hospital’s ancient resident.

The effort aimed in part to answer the question that has haunted the Ether Dome for nearly two centuries: Who is the man behind the mummy?

A few things are known about the mysterious Padi. About 2,500 years ago, 40-year-old Padihershef was unmarried and working as a stone-cutter in the Necropolis in Thebes.

Bone X-rays from 1931 and 1976 revealed stunted bone growth in Padi’s skeleton, suggesting he suffered from a grim illness in his childhood.

Part of the weekend’s hubbub was to compare these older bone scans to recent MRI’s to get a better understanding of how Padi died.  Leveque speculates that his bones may have been subject to a slow crushing from a large object, one theory of the cause of Padi’s death.

Whatever it was that annihilated the stone-cutting bachelor centuries ago, the afterlife has been kind to Padihershef’s looks and reputation. Lying between the top and bottom cases of his coffin — which was also receiving some modernizing restorative re-vamps — his celebrity mummy’s skin was deeply bronzed, encasing high cheekbones and a grin of teeth so white that even the slickest game-show host would be impressed.

“The Egyptians didn’t have sugar the way we do,” Leveque said. “Teeth preserve well.”

Continue reading

MGH Braces For Millions In Research Cuts

WBUR’s Curt Nickisch reports that Massachusetts General Hospital is budgeting for a $19 million cut next year due to decreases in federal research funding: 

MGH President Peter Slavin says the projected loss of $19 million is only part of it — that’s the amount that goes to the hospital to help pay overhead. Slavin says the National Institutes of Health has also been telling researchers to lower their maximum salaries, and warning that fewer grants will get the green light.

“Some young people who might have considered careers in biomedical research are just going to see this incredibly steep hill, and decide to do other things,” Slavin said. “That is tragic.”

mgh

Mass General’s annual research budget is about $800 million.

Last week WBUR reported on further sequester-related research cuts and how they might undermine basic science — and, specifically, Boston’s biomedical edge — in the future: Continue reading

Mass. General’s Last Marathon Bombing Patient Checks Out

Here’s a nice landmark: Just over six weeks after the Boston Marathon bombings, Massachusetts General Hospital has just released its last remaining marathon patient out of the 31 initially hospitalized there. It reports that Marc Fucarile headed out to rehab care today.

In the touching May 10 video by the Boston Globe above, Marc discusses the anxiety that lingered for him and his “worrywart” son after the bombings: “You can’t trust anybody. You can’t believe this guy just did this to everybody and killed innocent people.

‘There’s more good in the world than there is bad.’

“But then, at the same time, the next day you have random people, strangers, just offering things, sending you things, giving you things, helping you, praying for you, lighting candles…what other people are doing just makes you feel like there’s more good in the world than there is bad.”

WBUR has been tracking the marathon-related patients, and finds that now just one remains hospitalized: Nicole Brannock Gross at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, whose first media interview appears here on CBS today. She is expected to be released this week. At last count, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital still had nine marathon-related patients.

I’m just taking a moment to savor the contrast between today’s positive news and the daunting lists that the newsroom was gathering just after the attacks. Here’s an example from April 18:

Marathon Patients
TOTAL: 191 (at 14 hospitals)
Beth Israel – 24
Boston Medical Center – 23 (10 critical)
Brigham – 35 (5 critical)
Cambridge Health Alliance affiliated centers -5 (All walk-ins, treated and released)
Carney – 7 (all treated and released)
Children’s – 10 (3 still hospitalized)
Emerson – 2 (treated and released)
Faulkner – 13 (1 critical)
MGH – 29 (8 in critical, but stable)
Mount Auburn Hospital – 5 (all treated and released)
Newton Wellesley – 1
Norwood – 2 (hearing loss, treated and released)
St. E’s – 18 (all treated and released. Injuries ranged from schrapnel to hearing loss)
Tufts Medical Center – 17 (Some serious injuries but none considered life-threatening)

Note: This post was updated to include the CBS interview.

Specialist: My Prime Take-Home Points From ‘Dot Earth’ Reporter’s Stroke

 

 

This week, longtime New York Times reporter and popular “Dot Earth” blogger Andrew Revkin vividly describes his 2011 stroke in the first-person piece “My Lucky Stroke.” He includes these “prime take-home points”: “Take your body seriously. Time (wasted) is brain (lost). Question authority, but not too much. Old habits die hard.”

Dr. Lee Schwamm, chief of Massachusetts General Hospital’s stroke service and medical director of Mass General TeleHealth, would suggest that readers take away some rather different stroke lessons from Andy Revkin’s story. He shares them here.

By Dr. Lee H. Schwamm
Guest contributor

I congratulate the journalist and blogger Andy Revkin for courageously sharing the story of his stroke and his subsequent recovery. I also thank him for taking the time to share his personal experience for the benefit of his readers, and for the opportunity it presents to highlight some key learning points for patients, as we dissect his journey through the health-care system.

Mr. Revkin was relatively young and healthy, out for a run with his son, when he experienced stroke symptoms. All too often, when we think of stroke, we envision an older patient clutching their chest and being unable to move or speak. This stereotype is dangerous, both for patients and health-care providers, because it lowers our sensitivity to stroke-like symptoms in patients of any age.

Mr. Revkin and his son were concerned enough about his symptoms that he went home, but they didn’t appreciate the immediate seriousness of his condition and he took a shower, hoping his symptoms would resolve. Watch the video clip above showing a young news reporter having stroke-like symptoms, and ask yourself, would you have called 911 if you’d been present? You should have.

Without treatment to restore the blocked blood flow to the brain, 2 million nerve cells are dying every minute of continued stroke.

Then Mr. Revkin did what generations of doctors have advised us to do for a heart attack; namely, take some aspirin and call your doctor’s office. Unfortunately, when it comes to stroke, there are two types: those caused by blocked arteries (ischemic) and those caused by rupture of blood vessels (hemorrhagic). It’s not possible to tell just from symptoms if a stroke is ischemic or hemorrhagic; only a CAT scan or MRI can distinguish them.

Obviously, you don’t want to take an aspirin if you’re having bleeding in your brain, as it will make the bleeding worse. But it’s also not a great idea to take aspirin if it’s an ischemic stroke, especially not six aspirin, as Mr. Revkin did, because there are powerful clot-busting drugs that can be given to reverse the disability caused by ischemic stroke. These drugs — the main one is known as tPA — are only effective if they are given within the first 4.5 hours after the start of symptoms, and aspirin might increase the risk that the drugs could convert an ischemic stroke into a giant hemorrhage that could be fatal.

It’s also really important to realize, as Mr. Revkin mentions, that “time is brain.” Continue reading